René Descartes

1596 - 1650

A Quote by René Descartes on power

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Except our own thoughts, there is nothing absolutely in our power.

René Descartes (1596 - 1650)

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A Quote by René Descartes on power

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When it is not in our power to determine what is true, we ought to follow what is most probable.

René Descartes (1596 - 1650)

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A Quote by René Descartes on men

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Perfect numbers like perfect men are very rare.

René Descartes (1596 - 1650)

Source: H. Eves Mathematical Circles Squared, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1972.

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A Quote by René Descartes on discovery, hope, judgment, pleasure, and posterity

I hope that posterity will judge me kindly, not only as to the things which I have explained, but also to those which I have intentionally omitted so as to leave to others the pleasure of discovery.

René Descartes (1596 - 1650)

Source: La Geometrie.

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A Quote by René Descartes on improvement, learning, mind, and order

René Descartes (1596 - 1650)

Source: Discours de la Méthode. 1637. Albert W. Daw Collection

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A Quote by René Descartes on desires, good, and respect

Of all things, good sense is the most fairly distributed: everyone thinks he is so well supplied with it that even those who are the hardest to satisfy in every other respect never desire more of it than they already have.

René Descartes (1596 - 1650)

Source: Discours de la Méthode. 1637.

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A Quote by René Descartes on laws and observation

A state is better governed which has but few laws, and those laws strictly observed.

René Descartes (1596 - 1650)

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A Quote by René Descartes on thinking, rationality, philosophy, and being

Cogito ergo sum. (I think, therefore I am.)

René Descartes (1596 - 1650)

Source: Discours de la Méthode. 1637.

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A Quote by René Descartes on animals, certainty, knowledge, and nature

If we possessed a thorough knowledge of all the parts of the seed of any animal (e.g. man), we could from that alone, be reasons entirely mathematical and certain, deduce the whole conformation and figure of each of its members, and, conversely if we knew several peculiarities of this conformation, we would from those deduce the nature of its seed.

René Descartes (1596 - 1650)

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A Quote by René Descartes on difficulty, discovery, knowledge, order, and simplicity

These long chains of perfectly simple and easy reasonings by means of which geometers are accustomed to carry out their most difficult demonstrations had led me to fancy that everything that can fall under human knowledge forms a similar sequence; and that so long as we avoid accepting as true what is not so, and always preserve the right order of deduction of one thing from another, there can be nothing too remote to be reached in the end, or to well hidden to be discovered.

René Descartes (1596 - 1650)

Source: Discours de la Méthode. 1637.

Contributed by: Zaady

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