Plutarch

c.46 - c.120

A Quote by Plutarch on friendship

When the strong box contains no more, both friends and flatterers shun the door.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on life, soul, time, and world

But for the sake of some little mouthful of flesh we deprive a soul of the sun and light, and of that proportion of life and time it had been born into the world to enjoy.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Source: Moralia

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on life, purpose, and time

The whole life of man is but a point of time; let us enjoy it, therefore, while it lasts, and not spend it to no purpose.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Source: Of the Training of Children

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on danger, deed, evil, good, nobility, and risk

To do an evil act is base. To do a good one without incurring danger, is common enough. But it is part of a good man to do great and noble deeds though he risks everything in doing them.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Source: Moralia

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch

Where the lion's skin will not reach, you must patch it out with the fox's.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Source: Lives, Lysander

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on soul, time, and world

Pythagoras, when he was asked what time it was, answered that it was the soul of this world.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Source: Moralia

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on failure and good

To fail to do good is as bad as doing harm.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on needs

in

Nothing is cheap which is superfluous, for what one does not need, is dear at a penny.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Source: Moralia

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on death

in

Thamus . . . uttered with a loud voice his message, "The great Pan is dead."

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Source: Why the Oracles cease to give Answers.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on perseverance, violence, and yielding

Perseverance is more prevailing than violence; and many things which cannot be overcome when they are together, yield themselves up when taken little by little.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Source: Moralia

Contributed by: Zaady

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