Plutarch

c.46 - c.120

A Quote by Plutarch on difficulty and work

It is a thing of no great difficulty to raise objections against another man's oration - nay, it is a very easy matter; but to produce a better in its place is a work extremely troublesome.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on learning and proverbs

It is a true proverb, that if you live with a lame man, you will learn to limp.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on friendship

When the strong box contains no more, both friends and flatterers shun the door.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on life, soul, time, and world

But for the sake of some little mouthful of flesh we deprive a soul of the sun and light, and of that proportion of life and time it had been born into the world to enjoy.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Source: Moralia

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on life, purpose, and time

The whole life of man is but a point of time; let us enjoy it, therefore, while it lasts, and not spend it to no purpose.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Source: Of the Training of Children

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on idleness and poverty

Poverty is not dishonorable in itself, but only when it comes from idleness, intemperance, extravagance and folly.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Source: Moralia

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on adversity, balance, friendship, justice, and prosperity

Prosperity is no just scale; adversity is the only balance to weigh friends.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Source: Moralia

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch

Pompey bade Sylla recollect that more worshipped the rising than the setting sun.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Source: Life of Pompey.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on beginning

[about Theseus, began the saying:] He is a second Hercules.

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Source: Lives, Aemilius Paulus

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plutarch on chastity, divorce, friendship, and wives

A Roman divorced from his wife, being highly blamed by his friends, who demanded, "Was she not chaste? Was she not fair? Was she not fruitful?" holding out his shoe, asked them whether it was not new and well made. "Yet," added he, "none of you can tell where it pinches me.''

Plutarch (c.46 - c.120)

Source: Lives, Aemilius Paulus

Contributed by: Zaady

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