Plato

c.427 - 347 BC

A Quote by Plato on kindness, medicine, and punishment

It is as expedient that a wicked man be punished as that a sick man be cured by a physician; for all chastisement is a kind of medicine.

Plato (c.427 - 347 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plato on belief and men

in

When men speak ill of you, live so as nobody may believe them.

Plato (c.427 - 347 BC)

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plato on perception and science

Science is nothing but perception.

Plato (c.427 - 347 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plato on beginning, culture, death, education, journeys, service, soul, and world

The soul takes nothing with her to the other world but her education and culture; and these, it is said, are of the greatest service or of the greatest injury to the dead man, at the very beginning of his journey hither.

Plato (c.427 - 347 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plato

I have hardly ever known a mathematician who was capable of reasoning.

Plato (c.427 - 347 BC)

Source: N. Rose Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh NC:Rome Press Inc., 1988.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plato on facts

in

He is unworthy of the name of man who is ignorant of the fact that the diagonal of a square is incommensurable with its side.

Plato (c.427 - 347 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plato on god

in

He who can properly define and divide is to be considered a god.

Plato (c.427 - 347 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plato on difficulty and mathematics

Mathematics is like checkers in being suitable for the young, not too difficult, amusing, and without peril to the state.

Plato (c.427 - 347 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plato

There still remain three studies suitable for free man. Arithmetic is one of them.

Plato (c.427 - 347 BC)

Source: J. R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plato on children, creation, fatherhood, justice, money, people, and poets

. . . you did not seem to me over-fond of money. And this is the way in general with those who have not made it themselves, while those who have are twice as fond of it as anyone else. For just as poets are fond of their own poems, and fathers of their own children, so money-makers become devoted to money, not only because, like other people, they find it useful, but because it's their own creation.

Plato (c.427 - 347 BC)

Source: The Republic

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content