Percy Shelley

1792 - 1822

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on despair and world

Then black despair, The shadow of a starless night, was thrown Over the world in which I moved alone.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: The Revolt of Islam. Dedication, Stanza 6.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on good, goodness, love, needs, power, tears, and wisdom

The good want power, but to weep barren tears. The powerful goodness want: worse need for them. The wise want love; and those who love want wisdom.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on criticism, expectation, and merit

In the firm expectation that when London shall be a habitation of bitterns, when St. Paul and Westminster Abbey shall stand shapeless and nameless ruins in the midst of an unpeopled marsh, when the piers of Waterloo Bridge shall become the nuclei of islets of reeds and osiers, and cast the jagged shadows of their broken arches on the solitary stream, some Transatlantic commentator will be weighing in the scales of some new and now unimagined system of criticism the respective merits of the Bells and the Fudges and their historians.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: Dedication to Peter Bell.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on change and suffering

Nothing of him that doth fade But doth suffer a sea-change Into something rich and strange

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: (Protestant Cemetery; Rome, Italy)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on good and imagination

The great instrument of moral good is the imagination.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on deed

in

For there are deeds which have no form, sufferings which have no tongue.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on life, pain, suffering, and wishes

I wish no living thing to suffer pain.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on chastity, happiness, misery, sensuality, and superstition

Chastity is a monkish and evangelical superstition, a greater foe to natural temperance even than unintellectual sensuality; it strikes at the root of all domestic happiness, and consigns more than half of the human race to misery.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on crime and merit

It is not a merit to tolerate, but rather a crime to be intolerant.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on imagination and spirit

Whatever strengthens and purifies the affections, enlarges the imagination, and adds spirit to sense, is useful.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

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