Percy Shelley

1792 - 1822

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on existence and misery

It were much better that a sentient being should never have existed, than that it should have existed only to endure unmitigated misery.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on lies

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For this is the most civil sort of lie That can be given to a man's face. I now Say what I think.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: Translation of Calderon's Magico Prodigioso. Scene i.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on eternity and life

Life, like a dome of many-coloured glass, Stains the white radiance of eternity.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: Adonais. lii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on familiarity and love

Familiar acts are beautiful through love.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on best friend and friendship

Have you not heard When a man marries, dies, or turns Hindoo, His best friends hear no more of him?

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: Letter to Maria Gisborne

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on death, life, and sleep

Death is the veil which those who live call life; They sleep, and it is lifted.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: Prometheus Unbound

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A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on despair and world

Then black despair, The shadow of a starless night, was thrown Over the world in which I moved alone.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: The Revolt of Islam. Dedication, Stanza 6.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on chastity, happiness, misery, sensuality, and superstition

Chastity is a monkish and evangelical superstition, a greater foe to natural temperance even than unintellectual sensuality; it strikes at the root of all domestic happiness, and consigns more than half of the human race to misery.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on crime and merit

It is not a merit to tolerate, but rather a crime to be intolerant.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on imagination and spirit

Whatever strengthens and purifies the affections, enlarges the imagination, and adds spirit to sense, is useful.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

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