Pema Chodron

A Quote by Pema Chodron on buddhism and impermanence

That nothing is static or fixed, that all is fleeting and impermanent, is the first mark of existence. It is the ordinary state of affairs. Everything is in process. Everything—every tree, every blade of grass, all the animals, insects, human beings, buildings, the animate and the inanimate—is always changing, moment to moment.

Pema Chodron

Source: The Places that Scare You : A Guide to Fearlessness in Difficult Times (Shambhala Classics)

Contributed by: Jessica

A Quote by Pema Chodron on buddhism, thoughts, and attachment

Sometimes we find that we like our thoughts so much that we don’t want to let them go.

Pema Chodron

Source: The Places that Scare You : A Guide to Fearlessness in Difficult Times (Shambhala Classics)

Contributed by: Jessica

A Quote by Pema Chodron on buddhism, patterns, karma, habits, and practice

Ordinarily we are swept away by habitual momentum and don’t interrupt our patterns slightly. When we feel betrayed or disappointed, does it occur to us to practice?

Pema Chodron

Source: The Places that Scare You : A Guide to Fearlessness in Difficult Times (Shambhala Classics)

Contributed by: Jessica

A Quote by Pema Chodron on practice, buddhism, and emotions

The essence of practice is always the same: instead of falling prey to a chain reaction of revenge or self-hatred, we gradually learn to catch the emotional reaction and drop the story lines.

Pema Chodron

Source: The Places that Scare You : A Guide to Fearlessness in Difficult Times (Shambhala Classics)

Contributed by: Jessica

A Quote by Pema Chodron on compassion, communication, change, self, and mindfulness

This leads to a bigger underlying issue for all of us: How are we ever going to change anything? How is there going to be less aggression in the universe rather than more? We can then bring it down to a more personal level: how do I learn to communicate with somebody who is hurting me or someone who is hurting a lot of people? How do I speak to someone so that some change actually occurs? How do I communicate so that the space opens up and both of us begin to touch in to some kind of basic intelligence that we all share? In a potentially violent encounter, how do I communicate so that neither of us becomes increasingly furious and aggressive? How do I communicate to the heart so that a stuck situation can ventilate? How do I communicate so that things that seem frozen, unworkable, and eternally aggressive begin to soften up, and some kind of compassionate exchange begins to happen?

Well, it starts with being willing to feel what we are going through. It starts with being willing to have a compassionate relationship with the parts of ourselves that we feel are not worthy of existing on the planet. If we are willing through meditation to be mindful not only of what feels comfortable, but also of what pain feels like, if we even aspire to stay awake and open to what we're feeling, to recognize and acknowledge it as best we can in each moment, then something begins to change.

Pema Chodron

Source: When Things Fall Apart : Heart Advice for Difficult Times (Shambhala Classics)

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Pema Chodron on hope, fear, spirituality, journey, compassion, and life

 Life is a good teacher and a good friend. Things are always in transition if we could only realize it. Nothing ever sums itself up in the way that we would like to dream about. The off-center, in between state is an ideal situation, a situation in which we don't get caught, and in which we can open our hearts and minds beyond limit.

The spiritual journey involves going beyond hope and fear, stepping into unknown territory, continually moving forward. The most important aspect of being on the spiritual path may be to just keep moving. Usually, when we reach our limit, we feel exactly like Rinpoche's attendants and freeze in terror. Our bodies freeze and so do our minds. Rather than indulge or reject our experience, we can somehow let the energy of the emotion, the quality of what we're feeling pierce us to the heart. This is a noble way to live. It’s the path of compassion - the path of cultivating human bravery and kindheartedness.

Pema Chodron

Source: When Things Fall Apart : Heart Advice for Difficult Times (Shambhala Classics)

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Pema Chodron on feeling, emotion, and communication

Only in an open, nonjudgmental space can we acknowledge what we are feeling. Only in an open space where we're not all caught up in our own version of reality can we see and hear and feel who others really are, which allows us to be with them and communicate with them properly.

Pema Chodron

Source: When Things Fall Apart : Heart Advice for Difficult Times (Shambhala Classics)

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Pema Chodron on compassion, practice, and communication

When we talk of compassion, we usually mean working with those less fortunate than ourselves. Because we have better opportunities, a good education, and good health, we should be compassionate toward those poor people who don't have any of that. However, in working with the teachings on how to awaken compassion and in trying to help others, we might come to realize that compassionate action involves working with ourselves as much as working with others. Compassionate action is a practice, one of the most advanced. There's nothing more advanced than relating with others. There's nothing more advanced than communication -- compassionate communication.

Pema Chodron

Source: When Things Fall Apart : Heart Advice for Difficult Times (Shambhala Classics)

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Pema Chodron on compassion, emptiness, freedom, and pain

 Buddhist words such as compassion and emptiness don't mean much until we start cultivating our innate ability simply to be there with pain with an open heart and the willingness not to instantly try to get ground under our feet. For instance, if what we're feeling is rage, we usually assume that there are only two ways to relate to it. One is to blame others. Lay it all on somebody else; drive all blames into everyone else. The other alternative is to feel guilty about our rage and blame ourselves.

Pema Chodron

Source: When Things Fall Apart : Heart Advice for Difficult Times (Shambhala Classics)

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Pema Chodron on pema chodron and buddhism

Cool loneliness allows us to look honestly and without aggression
at our own minds. We can gradually drop our ideals of who we think we
ought to be, or who we think we want to be, or who we think other people
think we want to be or ought to be. We give it up and just look directly
with compassion and humor at who we are. Then loneliness is no threat and
heartache, no punishment.

Pema Chodron

Contributed by: David Monk

Syndicate content