Niccolo Machiavelli

1469 - 1527

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli on difficulty, order, success, and uncertainty

There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Source: The Prince, 1532

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli on contempt, country, and religion

There is no surer sign of decay in a country than to see the rites of religion held in contempt.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli on desires, simplicity, suffering, and yielding

Man are so simple and yield so readily to the desires of the moment that he who will trick will always find another who will suffer himself to be tricked.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli on belief, difficulty, enemies, experience, fear, force, government, incredulity, laws, men, opportunity, order, rules, security, success, and uncertainty

Those who by valorous ways become princes, like these men ['Moses, Cyrus, Romulus, Theseus, and such like'], acquire a principality with difficulty, but they keep it with ease. The difficulties they have in acquiring it rise in part from the new rules and methods which they are forced to introduce to establish their government and its security. And it ought to be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, then to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things. Because the innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may do well under the new. This coolness arises partly from fear of the opponents, who have the laws on their side, and partly from the incredulity of men, who do not readily believe in new things until they have had a long experience of them. Thus it happens that whenever those who are hostile have the opportunity to attack they do it like partisans, whilst the others defend lukewarmly, in such wise that the prince is endangered along with them.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Source: The Prince, 1532

Contributed by: Zaady

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