Niccolo Machiavelli

1469 - 1527

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli on imitation

A prince being thus obliged to know well how to act as a beast must imitate the fox and the lion, for the lion cannot protect himself from traps, and the fox cannot defend himself from wolves. One must therefore be a fox to recognize traps, and a lion to frighten wolves.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Source: The prince, 1532

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli on needs and vengeance

If an injury has to be done to a man it should be so severe that his vengeance need not be feared.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Source: The Prince, 1513

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli on gifts, judgment, men, and reality

Men in general judge more from appearances than from reality. All men have eyes, but few have the gift of penetration.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli on flattery, men, respect, truth, and understanding

There is no other way of guarding oneself against flattery than by letting men understand that they will not offend you by speaking the truth; but when everyone can tell you the truth, you lose their respect.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Source: The prince, 1532

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli on accidents, food, liberty, and people

The people resemble a wild beast, which, naturally fierce and accustomed to live in the woods, has been brought up, as it were, in a prison and in servitude, and having by accident got its liberty, not being accustomed to search for its food, and not knowing where to conceal itself, easily becomes the prey of the first who seeks to incarcerate it again.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Source: Discourse upon the First Ten Books of Livy, bk. I, ch. 16

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli on contentment, honor, majorities, and men

When neither their property nor their honor is touched, the majority of men live content.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Source: The prince, 1532

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli

The end justifies the means.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli on glory, god, and sharing

God is not willing to do everything, and thus take away our free will and that share of glory which belongs to us.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Source: The prince, 1532

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli on belief, difficulty, enemies, experience, fear, force, government, incredulity, laws, men, opportunity, order, rules, security, success, and uncertainty

Those who by valorous ways become princes, like these men ['Moses, Cyrus, Romulus, Theseus, and such like'], acquire a principality with difficulty, but they keep it with ease. The difficulties they have in acquiring it rise in part from the new rules and methods which they are forced to introduce to establish their government and its security. And it ought to be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, then to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things. Because the innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may do well under the new. This coolness arises partly from fear of the opponents, who have the laws on their side, and partly from the incredulity of men, who do not readily believe in new things until they have had a long experience of them. Thus it happens that whenever those who are hostile have the opportunity to attack they do it like partisans, whilst the others defend lukewarmly, in such wise that the prince is endangered along with them.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Source: The Prince, 1532

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Niccoló Machiavelli on desires, laws, men, and nature

Whoever desires to found a state and give it laws, must start with assuming that all men are bad and ever ready to display their vicious nature, whenever they may find occasion for it.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469 - 1527)

Source: Discourse upon the First Ten Books of Livy, bk. I, ch. 3

Contributed by: Zaady

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