Neil Postman

19?? -

A Quote by Neil Postman on anthropology, books, doubt, efficiency, simplicity, time, and worth

Because he did not have time to read every new book in his field, the great Polish anthropologist Bronislaw Malinowski used a simple and efficient method of deciding which ones were worth his attention: Upon receiving a new book, he immediately checked the index to see if his name was cited, and how often. The more Malinowski the more compelling the book. No Malinowski, and he doubted the subject of the book was anthropology at all.

Neil Postman (19?? -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neil Postman on balance, humility, learning, mind, mistakes, perspective, physics, purpose, and science

"The scientific method," Thomas Henry Huxley once wrote, "is nothing but the normal working of the human mind." That is to say, when the mind is working; that is to say further, when it is engaged in corrrecting its mistakes. Taking this point of view, we may conclude that science is not physics, biology, or chemistry-is not even a "subject"-but a moral imperative drawn from a larger narrative whose purpose is to give perspective, balance, and humility to learning.

Neil Postman (19?? -)

Source: Neil Postman, The End of Education, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1995, p 68.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neil Postman on newspapers, problems, television, understanding, words, and world

The whole problem with news on television comes down to this: all the words uttered in an hour of news coverage could be printed on a page of a newspaper. And the world cannot be understood in one page.

Neil Postman (19?? -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neil Postman on familiarity, people, problems, and solution

People in distress will sometimes prefer a problem that is familiar to a solution that is not.

Neil Postman (19?? -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neil Postman on belief, confidence, conflict, conscience, creation, evolution, foolishness, ideas, laws, purpose, religion, science, teaching, and universe

Educators may bring upon themselves unnecessary travail by taking a tactless and unjustifiable position about the relation between scientific and religious narratives. We see this, of course, in the conflict concerning creation science. Some educators representing, as they think, the conscience of science act much like those legislators who in 1925 prohibited by law the teaching of evolution in Tennessee. In that case, anti-evolutionists were fearful that a scientific idea would undermine religious belief. Today, pro-evolutionists are fearful that a religious idea will undermine scientific belief. The former had insufficient confidence in religion; the latter insufficient confidence in science. The point is that profound but contradictory ideas may exist side by side, if they are constructed from different materials and methods and have different purposes. Each tells us something important about where we stand in the universe, and it is foolish to insist that they must despise each other.

Neil Postman (19?? -)

Source: Neil Postman, The End of Education, Alfred Knopf, New York, 1995, p 107.

Contributed by: Zaady

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