Nathaniel Hawthorne

1804 - 1864

A Quote by Nathaniel Hawthorne on butterfly and happiness

Happiness is as a butterfly, which, when pursued, is always beyond our grasp, but which, if you will sit down quietly, may alight upon you.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 - 1864)

Source: Civilization's Quotations: Life's Ideal

Contributed by: Amanda

A Quote by Nathaniel Hawthorne on place, world, individual, and choice

Every individual has a place to fill in the world, and it is important in some respect where he choses to be so or not.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 - 1864)

Source: What Do You Really Want for Your Children?

Contributed by: Nurture Girl

A Quote by Nathaniel Hawthorne on frost, garden, heart, nature, play, and power

Last night there came a frost, which has done great damage to my garden.  . . . It is sad that Nature will so sport with us poor mortals, inviting us with sunny smiles to confide in her; and then, when we are entirely in her power, striking us to the heart.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 - 1864)

Source: The Complete Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Nathaniel Hawthorne on body, disease, and spirit

A bodily disease, which we look upon as whole and entire within itself, may, after all, be but a symptom of some ailment in the spiritual part.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 - 1864)

Source: The Scarlet Letter

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Nathaniel Hawthorne on dictionary, evil, good, innocence, and words

Words, - so innocent and powerless are they, as standing in a dictionary; how potent for good and evil they become to one who knows how to combine them!

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 - 1864)

Source: The Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Nathaniel Hawthorne on honesty and people

No man, for any considerable period, can wear one face to himself, and another to the multitude, without finally getting bewildered as to which may be true.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 - 1864)

Source: The Scarlet Letter

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Nathaniel Hawthorne on family, friendship, literature, pleasure, and writing

The only sensible ends of literature are, first, the pleasurable toil of writing; second, the gratification of one's family and friends; and, lastly, the solid cash.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 - 1864)

Source: The Routledge Dictionary of Quotations

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Nathaniel Hawthorne on brotherhood, god, intellect, and sin

"What is the Unpardonable Sin?" asked the lime-burner; and then he shrank farther from his companion, trembling lest his question should be answered.

"It is a sin that grew within my own breast," replied Ethan Brand, standing erect, with a pride that distinguishes all enthusiasts of his stamp.  "A sin that grew nowhere else!  The sin of an intellect that triumphed over the sense of brotherhood with man and reverence for God, and sacrificed everything to its own mighty claims!"

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 - 1864)

Source: The Minister's Black Veil

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Nathaniel Hawthorne on biography, death, and world

It may be remarked, however, that, of all the events which constitute a person's biography, there is scarcely one - none certainly, of anything like a similar importance - to which the world so easily reconciles itself, as to his death.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 - 1864)

Source: The Departure

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Nathaniel Hawthorne on happiness, impulses, limits, men, and world

The world owes all its onward impulses to men ill at ease.  The happy man inevitably confines himself within ancient limits.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 - 1864)

Source: The House of the Seven Gables

Contributed by: Zaady

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