Miguel de Cervantes

1547 - 1616

A Quote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra on courage, world, stars, scars, striving, and unreachable

One man scorned and covered with scars still strove with his last ounce of courage to reach the unreachable stars; and the world will be better for this.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547 - 1616)

Source: The Impossible Dream

Contributed by: CC

A Quote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

'Tis said of love that it sometimes goes, sometimes flies; runs with one, walks gravely with another; turns a third into ice, and sets a fourth in a flame: it wounds one, another it kills: like lightning it begins and ends in the same moment: it makes that fort yield at night which it besieged but in the morning; for there is no force able to resist it.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547 - 1616)

Contributed by: Terrance

A Quote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra on love

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Love not what you are but only what you may become.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547 - 1616)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra on worth

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Three things too much, and three too little are pernicious to man; to speak much, and know little; to spend much, and have little; to presume much, and be worth little.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547 - 1616)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra on falsehood, truth, and water

Truth may be stretched, but cannot be broken, and always gets above falsehood, as oil does above water.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547 - 1616)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

He that will not when he may, When he would, he should have nay.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547 - 1616)

Source: Don Quixote, part i. book iii. chap. iv.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

'Tis the part of a wise man to keep himself today for tomorrow, and not venture all his eggs in one basket.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547 - 1616)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra on ambition, business, difficulty, foolishness, learning, and world

Make it thy business to know thyself, which is the most difficult lesson in the world. Yet from this lesson thou will learn to avoid the frog's foolish ambition of swelling to rival the bigness of the ox.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547 - 1616)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

I can tell where my own shoe pinches me.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547 - 1616)

Source: Don Quixote, pt. I, 1605, bk. IV, ch. 5

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

He who sings frightens away his ills.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547 - 1616)

Contributed by: Zaady

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