Michio Kaku

A Quote by Michio Kaku on god, the old man, einstein, books, science, order, calling, and religion

When scientists use the word God, they usually mean the God of Order. For example, one of the most important revelations in Einstein's early childhood took place when he read his first books on science. He immediately realized that most of what he had been taught about religion could not possibly be true. Throughout his career, however, he clung to the belief that a mysterious, divine Order existed in the universe. His life's calling, he would say, was to ferret out his thoughts, to determine whether he had any choice in creating the universe. Einstein repeatedly referred to this God in his writings, fondly calling him "the Old Man." When stumped with an intractable mathematical problem, he would often say, "God is subtle, but not malicious."

Michio Kaku

Source: Hyperspace : A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and the 10th Dimens ion, Pages: 331

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Michio Kaku on meaning and intellect

Some people seek meaning in life through personal gain, through personal relationship, or through personal experiences. However, it seems to me that being blessed with the intellect to divine the ultimate secrets of nature gives meaning enough to life.

Michio Kaku

Source: Hyperspace : A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and the 10th Dimens ion, Pages: 334

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Michio Kaku on scientists, mystics, cranks, charlatans, and higher dimensions

Scientists willing to risk their reputations on higher dimensions soon found themselves ridiculed by the scientific community. Higher-dimensional space became the last refuge for mystics, cranks, and charlatans.

Michio Kaku

Source: Hyperspace : A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and the 10th Dimens ion, Pages: 23

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Michio Kaku on mother, god, children, creation, genesis, and paradox

"Did God have a mother?" Children, when told that God made the heavens and the earth, innocently ask whether God had a mother. This deceptively simple question has stumped the elders of the church and embarrassed the finest theologians, precipitating some of the thorniest theological debates over the centuries. All the great religions have elaborate mythologies surrounding the divine act of Creation, but none of them adequately confronts the logical paradoxes inherent in the question that even children ask.

Michio Kaku

Source: Hyperspace : A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and the 10th Dimens ion, Pages: 191

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Michio Kaku on fish, parallel universes, hyperspace, parallel dimensions, and string theory

I often think that we are like the carp swimming contentedly in that pond. We live out our lives in our own "pond," confident that our universe consists of only the familiar and the visible. We smugly refuse to admit that parallel universes or dimensions can exist next to ours, just beyond our grasp. If our scientists invent concepts like forces, it is only because they cannot visualize the invisible vibrations that fill the empty space around us. Some scientists sneer at the mention of higher dimensions because they cannot be conveniently measured in the laboratory.

Michio Kaku

Source: Hyperspace : A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and the 10th Dimens ion, Pages: 5

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Michio Kaku on correction, facts, and theory

It is often stated that of all the theories proposed in this century, the silliest is quantum theory. In fact, some say that the only thing that quantum theory has going for it is that it is unquestionably correct.

Michio Kaku

Source: Michio Kaku Hyperspace, Oxford University Press, 1995, p 263.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Michio Kaku on foolishness, honesty, persistence, physics, science, scientists, theory, and work

There are many examples of old, incorrect theories that stubbornly persisted, sustained only by the prestige of foolish but well-connected scientists. . . . Many of these theories have been killed off only when some decisive experiment exposed their incorrectness. .. Thus the yeoman work in any science, and especially physics, is done by the experimentalist, who must keep the theoreticians honest.

Michio Kaku

Source: Michio Kaku Hyperspace, Oxford University Press, 1995, p 263.

Contributed by: Zaady

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