Matthew Arnold

1822 - 1888

A Quote by Matthew Arnold on argument, heart, mind, and women

With women the heart argues, not the mind.

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Source: Merope

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Arnold

Philistinism!-We have not the expression in English. Perhaps we have not the word because we have so much of the thing.

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Source: Essays of Criticism

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Arnold on criticism, life, and poetry

Poetry is at bottom a criticism of life.

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Arnold on genius, energy, nations, poetry, and spirit

Genius is mainly an affair of energy, and poetry is mainly an affair of genius; therefore a nation whose spirit is characterized by energy may well be imminent in poetry - and we have Shakespeare.

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Arnold on death and soul

in

And see all sights from pole to pole, And glance, and nod, and hustle by; And never once possess our soul Before we die.

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Source: A Southern Night

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Arnold on quiet

in

Strew on her roses, roses, And never a spray of yew! In quiet she reposes; Ah, would that I did too!

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Source: Requiescat.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Arnold on culture, god, reason, and words

There is no better motto which it [culture] can have than these words of Bishop Wilson, "To make reason and the will of God prevail."

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Source: Culture and Anarchy. P. 8.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Arnold

He bears the seed of ruin in himself.

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Source: Merope

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Arnold on misery

in

Resolve to be thyself: and know that he Who finds himself loses his misery.

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Source: Self Dependence

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Arnold on deed, heaven, and life

Thou waitest for the spark from heaven! and we, Light half-believers in our casual deeds . . . Who hesitate and falter life away, And lose tomorrow the ground won today- Ah, do not we, Wanderer, await it too?

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Source: The Scholar-Gypsy

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content