Marsilio Ficino

1433 - 1499

A Quote by Marsilio Ficino on power and sharing

Laurel crowns cleave to deserts And power to him who power exerts; Hast not thy share? On winged feet, Lo! it rushes thee to meet; . . .

Marsilio Ficino (1433 - 1499)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marsilio Ficino on cats, cities, and worth

A sturdy lad . . . who teams it, farms it . . . and always like a cat falls on his feet, is worth a hundred of these city dolls.

Marsilio Ficino (1433 - 1499)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marsilio Ficino on balance, extremism, labor, plants, and skepticism

The abstractionist and the materialist thus mutually exasperating each other, and the scoffer expressing the worst of materialism, there arises a third party to occupy the middle ground between these two, the skeptic, namely. He finds both wrong by being in extremes. He labors to plant his feet, to be the beam of the balance.

Marsilio Ficino (1433 - 1499)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marsilio Ficino on dance, deed, poetry, and thought

A lady with whom I was riding in the forest said to me that the woods always seemed to her to wait, as if the genii who inhabit them suspended their deeds until the wayfarer had passed onward; a thought which poetry has celebrated in the dance of the fairies, which breaks off on the approach of human feet.

Marsilio Ficino (1433 - 1499)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marsilio Ficino on people

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What is odious but . . . people . . . who toast their feet on the register. . . .

Marsilio Ficino (1433 - 1499)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marsilio Ficino on beginning, giving, and wealth

Wealth begins . . . in giving on all sides by tools and auxiliaries the greatest possible extension to our powers; as if it added feet and hands and eyes and blood. . . .

Marsilio Ficino (1433 - 1499)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marsilio Ficino on beauty, common sense, facts, heroism, poetry, and soul

Poetry being an attempt to express, not the common sense, - as the avoirdupois of the hero, or his structure in feet and inches, - but the beauty and soul in his aspect . . . runs into fable, personifies every fact. . . .

Marsilio Ficino (1433 - 1499)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marsilio Ficino

In England, The cold, inconsiderate of persons . . . benumbs your feet. . . .

Marsilio Ficino (1433 - 1499)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marsilio Ficino on education and laws

. . . the poor man, whom the law does not allow to take . . . a pair of shoes for his freezing feet, is allowed to put his hand into the pocket of the rich, and say, You shall educate me. . . .

Marsilio Ficino (1433 - 1499)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marsilio Ficino on blindness, fate, and losing

The fate of the poor shepherd, who, blinded and lost in the snow-storm, perishes in a drift within a few feet of his cottage door, is an emblem of the state of man.

Marsilio Ficino (1433 - 1499)

Contributed by: Zaady

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