Mark Twain

1835 - 1910

A Quote by Mark Twain on congress, crime, and facts

It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctly native American criminal class except Congress.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Source: Following the Equator, 1897

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on courage, curiosity, and world

It is curious that physical courage should be so common in the world and moral courage so rare.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on absence, criticism, discovery, people, relatives, and superstition

I have criticized absent people so often, and then discovered, to my humiliation, that I was talking with their relatives, that I have grown superstitious about that sort of thing and dropped it.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on horses

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It were not best that we should all think alike; it is the difference of opinion that makes horse races.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Source: Pudd'nhead Wilson's Calendar, 1894

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on country and surprises

Go and surprise the whole country by doing something right.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on boredom, children, family, and men

If men bore children, there would only be one born in each family.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on time

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More than one cigar at a time is excessive smoking.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on good

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Good breeding consists in concealing how much we think of ourselves and how little we think of the other person.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Source: Notebooks (1935)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on approval, funerals, and niceness

I refused to attend his funeral. But I wrote a very nice letter explaining that I approved of it.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on angels and babies

A baby is an angel whose wings decrease as his legs increase.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

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