Mark Twain

1835 - 1910

A Quote by Mark Twain on time

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More than one cigar at a time is excessive smoking.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on good

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Good breeding consists in concealing how much we think of ourselves and how little we think of the other person.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Source: Notebooks (1935)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on clothes, influence, people, and society

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence in society.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on commitment, friendship, heaven, and hell

I don't like to commit myself about heaven and hell - you see, I have friends in both places.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on compliments and good

I can live for two months on a good compliment.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on congress, crime, and facts

It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctly native American criminal class except Congress.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Source: Following the Equator, 1897

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on courage, curiosity, and world

It is curious that physical courage should be so common in the world and moral courage so rare.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on absence, criticism, discovery, people, relatives, and superstition

I have criticized absent people so often, and then discovered, to my humiliation, that I was talking with their relatives, that I have grown superstitious about that sort of thing and dropped it.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on animals, blush, and needs

Man is the only animal that blushes, or needs to.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on books, congress, darkness, libraries, and life

Suppose . . . burglars had made entry into this . . . [library]. Picture them seated here on this floor, pouring the light of their dark-lanterns over some books they found, and thus absorbing moral truths and getting moral uplift. The whole course of their lives would have been changed. As it was, they kept straight on in their immoral way and were sent to jail. For all I know, they may next be sent to Congress.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

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