Marianne Moore

1887 - 1972

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on insincerity

Nor was he insincere in saying, "Make my house your inn." Inns are not residences.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: Silence, 1935

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on heaven and power

O to be a dragon, a symbol of the power of Heaven-of silk-worm size or immense; at times invisible. Felicitous phenomenon!

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: O To Be a Dragon, 1959

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on accidents

Omissions are not accidents.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: Complete Poems, 1967

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore

Of the crow-blue mussel shells, one keeps adjusting the ash heaps; opening and shutting itself like an injured fan.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: The Fish, 1935, sr. I,.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on poetry

in

There is a great amount of poetry in unconscious fastidiousness.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: Critics and Connoisseurs, 1935

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on power

in

The power of the visible is the invisable.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: He "Digesteth Harde Yron," 1941, st. 8

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on animals, humor, and sense of humor

Among animals, one has a sense of humor. Humor saves a few steps, it saves years.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: The Pangolin, 1941, st. 8

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on day and water

in

The sweet air coming into your house on a fine day, from water etched with waves as formal as the scales on a fish.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: The Steeple-Jack, 1935, st. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on death and memory

We don't like flowers that do not wilt; they must die, and nine she-camel hairs aid memory.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: The Sycamore, 1956, st. 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on contempt and reading

I, too, dislike it. Reading it, however, with a perfect contempt for it, one discovers in it, after all, a place for the genuine.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: Poetry, 1935; revised 1967

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content