Marianne Moore

1887 - 1972

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore

They say there is a sweeter air where it was made, than we have here.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: A Carriage from Sweden, 1944

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on time and wonder

I wonder what Adam and Eve think of it by this time.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: Marriage, 1935

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on mind

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The mind is an enchanting thing is an enchanted thing, like the glaze on a katydid-wing subdivided by sun till the nettings are legion.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: The Mind Is an Enchanting Thing, 1944, st 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on insincerity

Nor was he insincere in saying, "Make my house your inn." Inns are not residences.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: Silence, 1935

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on heaven and power

O to be a dragon, a symbol of the power of Heaven-of silk-worm size or immense; at times invisible. Felicitous phenomenon!

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: O To Be a Dragon, 1959

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on accidents

Omissions are not accidents.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: Complete Poems, 1967

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore

Of the crow-blue mussel shells, one keeps adjusting the ash heaps; opening and shutting itself like an injured fan.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: The Fish, 1935, sr. I,.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on poetry

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There is a great amount of poetry in unconscious fastidiousness.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: Critics and Connoisseurs, 1935

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on excess and energy

Excess is the common substitute for energy.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on fatherhood, people, and superiority

My father used to say, "Superior people never make long visits, have to be shown Longfellows grave, or the glass flowers at Harvard."

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: Silence, 1935

Contributed by: Zaady

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