Marianne Moore

1887 - 1972

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on heaven and power

O to be a dragon, a symbol of the power of Heaven-of silk-worm size or immense; at times invisible. Felicitous phenomenon!

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: O To Be a Dragon, 1959

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on accidents

Omissions are not accidents.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: Complete Poems, 1967

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore

Of the crow-blue mussel shells, one keeps adjusting the ash heaps; opening and shutting itself like an injured fan.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: The Fish, 1935, sr. I,.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on poetry

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There is a great amount of poetry in unconscious fastidiousness.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: Critics and Connoisseurs, 1935

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on power

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The power of the visible is the invisable.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: He "Digesteth Harde Yron," 1941, st. 8

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on animals, humor, and sense of humor

Among animals, one has a sense of humor. Humor saves a few steps, it saves years.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: The Pangolin, 1941, st. 8

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on day and water

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The sweet air coming into your house on a fine day, from water etched with waves as formal as the scales on a fish.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: The Steeple-Jack, 1935, st. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore

They say there is a sweeter air where it was made, than we have here.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: A Carriage from Sweden, 1944

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore

I am troubled, I'm dissatisfied, I'm Irish.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: Spenser's Ireland, 1941, last line

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marianne Craig Moore on garden, imagination, poets, and present

Not till the poets among us can be "literalists of the imagination"-above insolence and triviality and can present for inspection, "imaginary gardens with real toads in them." shall we have it.

Marianne Moore (1887 - 1972)

Source: Poetry, 1935, st. 4, 5

Contributed by: Zaady

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