Margaret Atwood

1939 -

A Quote by Margaret Atwood on body, children, and modesty

The basic Female body comes with the following accessories: garter belt, panti-girdle, crinoline, camisole, bustle, brassiere, stomacher, chemise, virgin zone, spike heels, nose ring, veil, kid gloves, fishnet stockings, fichu, bandeau, Merry Widow, weepers, chokers, barrettes, bangles, beads, lorgnette, feather boa, basic black, compact, Lycra stretch one-piece with modesty panel, designer peignoir, flannel nightie, lace teddy, bed, head.

Margaret Atwood (1939 -)

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A Quote by Margaret Atwood on gifts, silence, and speech

A voice is a human gift; it should be cherished and used, to utter fully human speech as possible. Powerlessness and silence go together.

Margaret Atwood (1939 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Margaret Atwood on freedom, joy, people, time, understanding, and youth

I've never understood why people consider youth a time of freedom and joy. It's probably because they have forgotten their own.

Margaret Atwood (1939 -)

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A Quote by Margaret Atwood

The truly fearless think of themselves as normal.

Margaret Atwood (1939 -)

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A Quote by Margaret Atwood on day

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In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt.

Margaret Atwood (1939 -)

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A Quote by Margaret Atwood

Gardening is not a rational act.

Margaret Atwood (1939 -)

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A Quote by Margaret Atwood on thought

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We thought we were running away from the grownups, and now we are the grownups.

Margaret Atwood (1939 -)

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A Quote by Margaret Atwood on power

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A word after a word after a word is power.

Margaret Atwood (1939 -)

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A Quote by Margaret Atwood on adulthood, age, and belief

Another belief of mine; that everyone else my age is an adult, whereas I am merely in disguise.

Margaret Atwood (1939 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Margaret Atwood

If a stranger taps you on the ass and says, "How's the little lady today!" you will probably cringe. But if he's an American, he's only being friendly.

Margaret Atwood (1939 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

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