Marc Barasch

A Quote by Marc Ian Barasch on kindess, compassion, goodness, life, love, and nelson mandela

Nelson Mandela once remarked that he befriended his jailers, those grim, khaki-clad overseers of his decades of hard labor in a limestone quarry, by "exploiting their good qualities." Asked if he believed all people were kind at their core, he responded, "There is no doubt whatsoever, provided you are able to arouse their inherent goodness." If that sounds like wishful thinking, well, he actually did it.

Marc Barasch

Source: The Compassionate Life: Walking the Path of Kindness

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Marc Ian Barasch on compassion, kindness, transformation, goodwill, life, love, and acceptance

Every now and then, I'll meet an escapee, someone who has broken free of self-centeredness and lit out for the territory of compassion. You've met them, too, those people who seem to emit a steady stream of, for want of a better word, love-vibes. As soon as you come within range, you feel embraced, accepted for who you are. For those of us who suspect that you rarely get something for nothing, such geniality can be discomfiting. Yet it feels so good to be around them. They stand there, radiating photons of goodwill, and despite yourself you beam back, and the world, in a twinkling, changes.

Marc Barasch

Source: The Compassionate Life: Walking the Path of Kindness

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Marc Ian Barasch on spirituality, love, heart, life, spiritual, living, and compassion

For at the center of all spiritual traditions is the beacon of a truly radical proposal: Open your heart to everybody. Everybody.

Marc Barasch

Source: The Compassionate Life: Walking the Path of Kindness

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Marc Ian Barasch on compassion, tonglen, and meditation

I happened to be present one of the first times Tibetan meditation master Chögyam Trungpa sprang this bizarre sounding practice on an unsuspecting Western audience. One student of yoga had raised his hand and asked, with some bewilderment, why it wouldn't be better to imagine breathing in love and light and breathing out all negative impurities. Ricardo, the creator of environmentally benign industrial processes, would have appreciated Trungpa's unhesitating reply: “Well, then you'd just be like a polluting factory, taking in all these good resources and spewing out your gray cloud on everyone else.”

Marc Barasch

Source: The Compassionate Life: Walking the Path of Kindness

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Marc Ian Barasch on tonglen, meditation, compassion, and love

Sometimes when I begin tonglen meditation, I feel a wild surge of resistance, a fear of (there is no other way to put this) contamination. The unhappiness of others feels contagious: I don't want to inhale their cooties. But when it “works,” the practice is so rewarding that I'm ready to throw myself in again. To stop dodging people's misery and discord, to discover that I can give of myself with each breath and not feel depleted (in fact, to feel oddly nourished) is a revelation. When I can stay with it, I notice I don't feel so guarded; my borders seem more porous. I'm less inclined to hold people at arms' length. I admit to sometimes finding tonglen a challenge that I don't have the spiritual chutzpah to meet. But at best I find the technique radically simple and simply radical: an imaginative leap into otherness.

Marc Barasch

Source: The Compassionate Life: Walking the Path of Kindness

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Marc Ian Barasch on meditation, compassion, thoughts, and letting go

Once, at a seminar, I heard a Westernized lama say that a meditator's state of mind should be like that of a hotel doorman. A doorman lets the guests in, but he doesn't follow them up to their rooms. He lets them out, but he doesn't walk into the street with them to their next appointment. He greets them all, then lets them go on about their business. Meditation is, in its initial stages, simply accustoming oneself to letting thoughts come and go without grasping at their sleeves or putting up a velvet rope to keep them out.

Marc Barasch

Source: The Compassionate Life: Walking the Path of Kindness

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Marc Ian Barasch on compassion, buddhism, and suffering

A friend told me of visiting the Dalai Lama in India and asking him for a succinct definition of compassion. She prefaced her question by describing how heart-stricken she'd felt when, earlier that day, she'd seen a man in the street beating a mangy stray dog with a stick. “Compassion,” the Dalai Lama told her, “is when you feel as sorry for the man as you do for the dog.”

Marc Barasch

Source: The Compassionate Life: Walking the Path of Kindness

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Marc Ian Barasch on kindness, compassion, and hatred

I used to think that people who regarded everyone benignly were a mite simple or oblivious or just plain lax—until I tried it myself. Then I realized that they made it only look easy. Even the Berditchever Rebbe, revered as a man who could strike a rock and bring forth a stream, was continually honing his intentions. “Until I remove the thread of hatred from my heart,” he said of his daily meditations, “I am, in my own eyes, as if I did not exist.”

Marc Barasch

Source: The Compassionate Life: Walking the Path of Kindness

Contributed by: Siona

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