Mao Tse-tung

1893 - 1976

A Quote by Mao Tse-tung on dance, mountains, trying, and water

Snow The scene is the north lands. Thousands of li sealed in ice, en thousand li in blowing snow. From the Long Wall I gaze inside and beyond and see only vast tundra. Up and down the Yellow River the gurgling water is frozen. Mountains dance like silver snakes, hills gallop like wax bright elephants trying to climb over the sky. On days of sunlight the planet teases us in her white dress and rouge.

Mao Tse-tung (1893 - 1976)

Source: The Poems of Mao Tse-tung, Harper & Row

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mao Tse-tung on death, past, time, and water

Swlmmlng After swallowing some water at Changsha I taste a Wuchang fish in the surf and swim across the Yangtze River that winds ten thousand li. I see the entire Chu sky. Wind batters me, waves hit me-I don't care. Better than walking lazily in the patio. Today I have a lot of time. Here on the river the Master said "Dying-dying into the past-is like a river flowing."

Mao Tse-tung (1893 - 1976)

Source: The Poems of Mao Tse-tung, Harper & Row

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mao Tse-tung on colors, earth, judgment, men, mountains, and passion

Kunlun Mountain Over the earth the greenblue monster Kunlun who has seen all spring color and passion of men. Three million dragons of white jade soar and freeze the whole sky with snow. When a summer sun heats the globe rivers flood and men turn into fish and turtles. Who can judge a thousand years of accomplishments or failures?

Mao Tse-tung (1893 - 1976)

Source: The Poems of Mao Tse-tung, Harper & Row

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mao Tse-tung on communism, enemies, and love

Communism is not love. Communism is a hammer which we use to crush the enemy.

Mao Tse-tung (1893 - 1976)

Source: 1950 quoted in Time

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mao Tse-tung on cities, courage, earth, enemies, fame, feeling, heaven, and mountains

Capture of Nanking Rain and a windstorm rage blue and yellow over Chung the bell mountain as a million peerless troops cross the Great River. The peak is a coiled dragon, the city a crouching tiger more dazzling than before. The sky is spinning and the earth upside down. We are elated yet we must use our courage to chase the hopeless enemy. We must not stoop to fame like the overlord Hsiang Yu. If heaven has feeling it will grow old and watch our seas turn into mulberry fields. April 1949

Mao Tse-tung (1893 - 1976)

Source: The Poems of Mao Tse-tung, Harper & Row

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mao Tse-tung on beginning and people

At the beginning of anything out of the ordinary, the mass of the people always dislike it.

Mao Tse-tung (1893 - 1976)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mao Tse-tung on mankind, mountains, poets, and taoism

Climbing Lushan The mountain looms firmly over the Great River. I climb four hundred bends to its green lush peak. With cool eyes I stare at the rim of mankind and the sea beyond. Hot wind blows rain in the sky and down to the river. Clouds over the nine tributaries and the floating yellow crane, where waves ripple toward the Three Wu. White mist flies up. Who knows where Tao, the ancient poet, has gone? Is he farming in the Land of the Peach Blossoms? July 1, 1959

Mao Tse-tung (1893 - 1976)

Source: The Poems of Mao Tse-tung, Harper & Row

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mao Tse-tung on correction, legacy, struggle, and study

In the struggle to defend the legacy of Leninism . . . [Stalin] proved himself to be an outstanding Marxist-Leninist fighter. . . . Stalin's works should, as before, be seriously studied . . . [to] see what is correct and what is not.

Mao Tse-tung (1893 - 1976)

Source: On the Historical Experience of the Dictatorship of the Proletariat (1956)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mao Tse-tung

. . . dogma is less useful than cow dung. One can make whatever one likes out of it, even revisionism. . . .

Mao Tse-tung (1893 - 1976)

Source: Interview with André Malraux, July 1965

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mao Tse-tung on beginning, companions, pollution, security, and water

While swimming in the heavily polluted rivers of south China, despite the pleadings of his security guards and his physician, he would chide his companions if they began to panic in the water: Maybe you're afraid of sinking, Don't think about it. If you don't think about it, you won't sink. If you do, you will.

Mao Tse-tung (1893 - 1976)

Contributed by: Zaady

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