Lyndon Baines Johnson

1808 - 1973

A Quote by Lyndon Baines Johnson on dedication, destiny, effort, faith, imagination, life, energy, men, and peace

No man should think that peace comes easily. Peace does not come by merely wanting it, or shouting for it, or marching down Main Street for it. Peace is built brick by brick, mortared by the stubborn effort and the total energy and imagination of able and dedicated men. And it is built in the living faith that, in the end, man can and will master his own destiny.

Lyndon Baines Johnson (1808 - 1973)

Source: The Vantage Point: Perspectives of the Presidency, 1963-1969, 1971.

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A Quote by Lyndon Baines Johnson on journeys, peace, and time

Peace is a journey of a thousand miles and it must be taken one step at a time.

Lyndon Baines Johnson (1808 - 1973)

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A Quote by Lyndon Baines Johnson on failure and power

We often say how impressive power is. But I do not find it impressive at all. The guns and the bombs, the rockets and the warships, are all symbols of human failure. They are necessary symbols. They protect what we cherish.

Lyndon Baines Johnson (1808 - 1973)

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A Quote by Lyndon Baines Johnson on good

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Any jackass can kick down a barn but it takes a good carpenter to build one.

Lyndon Baines Johnson (1808 - 1973)

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A Quote by Lyndon Baines Johnson on conviction

What convinces is conviction.

Lyndon Baines Johnson (1808 - 1973)

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A Quote by Lyndon Baines Johnson on chance, generations, labor, life, meaning, nations, and society

This nation, this generation, in this hour has man's first chance to build a Great Society, a place where the meaning of man's life matches the marvels of man's labor.

Lyndon Baines Johnson (1808 - 1973)

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A Quote by Lyndon Baines Johnson on hunger

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To hunger for use and to go unused is the worst hunger of all.

Lyndon Baines Johnson (1808 - 1973)

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A Quote by Lyndon Baines Johnson on ignorance and poverty

Poverty has many roots, but the tap root is ignorance.

Lyndon Baines Johnson (1808 - 1973)

Contributed by: Zaady

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