Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington

1800 - 1859

A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on blessings, country, government, people, and trade

Free trade, one of the greatest blessings which a government can confer on a people, is in almost every country unpopular.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Mitford's History of Greece. 1824. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on fashion and honor

Ambrose Phillips . . . who had the honor of bringing into fashion a species of composition which has been called, after his name, Namby Pamby.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: Review of Aikin s Life of Addison, 1843

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on dignity and history

I shall cheerfully bear the reproach of having descended below the dignity of history.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: History of England. Vol. i. Chap. i. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on heroism, life, poets, and work

The Life of Johnson is assuredly a great, a very great work. Homer is not more decidedly the first of heroic poets. Shakespeare is not more decidedly the first of dramatists, Demosthenes is not more decidedly the first of orators, than Boswell is the first of biographers. He has no second.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: Macaulay, Samuel Johnson, 1831

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on character

The measure of a man's real character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on certainty, earth, good, heaven, poetry, principles, words, and writing

Re: Robert Montgomery's Poems His writing bears the same relation to poetry which a Turkey carpet bears to a picture. There are colours in the Turkey carpet out of which a picture might be made. There are words in Mr. Montgomery's writing which, when disposed in certain orders and combinations,have made, and will make again, good poetry. But, as they now stand, they seem to be put together on principle in such a manner as to give no image of anything in the heavens above, or in the earth beneath, or in the waters under the earth.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: Literary Essays in the Edinburgh Review

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