Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington

1800 - 1859

A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on certainty, earth, good, heaven, poetry, principles, words, and writing

Re: Robert Montgomery's Poems His writing bears the same relation to poetry which a Turkey carpet bears to a picture. There are colours in the Turkey carpet out of which a picture might be made. There are words in Mr. Montgomery's writing which, when disposed in certain orders and combinations,have made, and will make again, good poetry. But, as they now stand, they seem to be put together on principle in such a manner as to give no image of anything in the heavens above, or in the earth beneath, or in the waters under the earth.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: Literary Essays in the Edinburgh Review

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on death, earth, and fatherhood

To every man upon this earth Death cometh soon or late; And how can man die better Than facing fearful odds For the ashes of his fathers And the temples of his gods?

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: Lays of Ancient Rome. Horatius, xxvii. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay

Ye diners-out from whom we guard our spoons.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: Political Georgics. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on men and questions

Men are never so likely to settle a question rightly as when they discuss it freely.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: "Southey's Coloquies on Society," 1830.

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on evil, good, nature, and present

It is the nature of man to overrate present evil and to underrate present good; to long for what he has not, and to be dissatisfied with what he has.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: History of England

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on kindness and mind

I have not the Chancellor's encyclopedic mind. He is indeed a kind of semi-Solomon. He half knows everything, from the cedar to the hyssop.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: Letter to Macvey Napier, Dec. 17, 1830. (From His Essays.)

Contributed by: Zaady

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