Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington

1800 - 1859

A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay

These be the great Twin Brethren To whom the Dorians pray.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: The Battle of Lake Regillus. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on love

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He had a head which statuaries loved to copy, and a foot the deformity of which the beggars in the streets mimicked.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Moore's Life of Lord Byron. 1830. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on future and generations

Every generation enjoys the use of a vast hoard bequeathed to it by antiquity, and transmits that hoard, augmented by fresh acquisitions, to future ages.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: History of England

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on history, nations, and study

The history of nations, in the sense in which I use the word, is often best studied in works not professedly historical.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Mitford's History of Greece. 1824. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay

Ye diners-out from whom we guard our spoons.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: Political Georgics. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on men and questions

Men are never so likely to settle a question rightly as when they discuss it freely.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: "Southey's Coloquies on Society," 1830.

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on evil, good, nature, and present

It is the nature of man to overrate present evil and to underrate present good; to long for what he has not, and to be dissatisfied with what he has.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: History of England

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on kindness and mind

I have not the Chancellor's encyclopedic mind. He is indeed a kind of semi-Solomon. He half knows everything, from the cedar to the hyssop.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: Letter to Macvey Napier, Dec. 17, 1830. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on flattery

It is possible to be below flattery as well as above it.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on blessings, country, government, people, and trade

Free trade, one of the greatest blessings which a government can confer on a people, is in almost every country unpopular.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Mitford's History of Greece. 1824. (From His Essays.)

Contributed by: Zaady

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