Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington

1800 - 1859

A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on love

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He had a head which statuaries loved to copy, and a foot the deformity of which the beggars in the streets mimicked.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Moore's Life of Lord Byron. 1830. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on future and generations

Every generation enjoys the use of a vast hoard bequeathed to it by antiquity, and transmits that hoard, augmented by fresh acquisitions, to future ages.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: History of England

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on history, nations, and study

The history of nations, in the sense in which I use the word, is often best studied in works not professedly historical.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Mitford's History of Greece. 1824. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on age, companions, destiny, genius, men, and posterity

What a singular destiny has been that of this remarkable man!-To be regarded in his own age as a classic, and in ours as a companion! To receive from his contemporaries that full homage which men of genius have in general received only from posterity; to be more intimately known to posterity than other men are known to their contemporaries!

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Boswell's Life of Johnson (Croker's ed.). 1831. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on evil, good, nature, and present

It is the nature of man to overrate present evil and to underrate present good; to long for what he has not, and to be dissatisfied with what he has.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: History of England

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on kindness and mind

I have not the Chancellor's encyclopedic mind. He is indeed a kind of semi-Solomon. He half knows everything, from the cedar to the hyssop.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: Letter to Macvey Napier, Dec. 17, 1830. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on flattery

It is possible to be below flattery as well as above it.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on blessings, country, government, people, and trade

Free trade, one of the greatest blessings which a government can confer on a people, is in almost every country unpopular.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Mitford's History of Greece. 1824. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on fashion and honor

Ambrose Phillips . . . who had the honor of bringing into fashion a species of composition which has been called, after his name, Namby Pamby.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: Review of Aikin s Life of Addison, 1843

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on dignity and history

I shall cheerfully bear the reproach of having descended below the dignity of history.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: History of England. Vol. i. Chap. i. (From His Essays.)

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