Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington

1800 - 1859

A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on mind

in

The conformation of his mind was such that whatever was little seemed to him great, and whatever was great seemed to him little.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Horace Walpole. 1833. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on abuse, art, inferiority, judgment, and talent

A man possessed of splendid talents, which he often abused, and of a sound judgment, the admonitions of which he often neglected; a man who succeeded only in an inferior department of his art, but who in that department succeeded pre-eminently.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On John Dryden. 1828. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on beauty, books, language, and power

The English Bible,-a book which if everything else in our language should perish, would alone suffice to show the whole extent of its beauty and power.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On John Dryden. 1828. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay

These be the great Twin Brethren To whom the Dorians pray.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: The Battle of Lake Regillus. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on love

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He had a head which statuaries loved to copy, and a foot the deformity of which the beggars in the streets mimicked.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Moore's Life of Lord Byron. 1830. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on future and generations

Every generation enjoys the use of a vast hoard bequeathed to it by antiquity, and transmits that hoard, augmented by fresh acquisitions, to future ages.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: History of England

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on history, nations, and study

The history of nations, in the sense in which I use the word, is often best studied in works not professedly historical.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Mitford's History of Greece. 1824. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on age, companions, destiny, genius, men, and posterity

What a singular destiny has been that of this remarkable man!-To be regarded in his own age as a classic, and in ours as a companion! To receive from his contemporaries that full homage which men of genius have in general received only from posterity; to be more intimately known to posterity than other men are known to their contemporaries!

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Boswell's Life of Johnson (Croker's ed.). 1831. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on freedom, learning, maxims, people, politicians, and water

Many politicians lay it down as a self-evident proposition that no people ought to be free till they are fit to use their freedom. The maxim is worthy of the fool in the old story, who resolved not to go into the water till he had learned to swim.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on age, genius, poetry, and proof

We hold that the most wonderful and splendid proof of genius is a great poem produced in a civilized age.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Milton. 1825. (From His Essays.)

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