Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington

1800 - 1859

A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on praise and women

The sweeter sound of woman's praise.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: Lines written in August, 1847. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay

An acre in Middlesex is better than a principality in Utopia.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on accidents, birth, chance, elections, neighbors, perception, popularity, questions, reason, security, and thinking

We see no reason for thinking that the opinions of the magistrate on speculative questions are more likely to be right than those of any other man. None of the modes by which a magistrate is appointed, popular election, the accident of the lot, or the accident of birth, affords, as far as we can perceive, much security for his being wiser than any of his neighbors. The chance of his being wiser than all his neighbors together is still smaller.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: 1830

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on admiration, books, love, and simplicity

That wonderful book, while it obtains admiration from the most fastidious critics, is loved by those who are too simple to admire it.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress. 1831. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on ethics, love, poetry, and wives

From the poetry of Lord Byron they drew a system of ethics compounded of misanthropy and voluptuousness,-a system in which the two great commandments were to hate your neighbour and to love your neighbour's wife.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Moore's Life of Lord Byron. 1830. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on pain and pleasure

The Puritan hated bear-baiting, not because it gave pain to the bear, but because it gave pleasure to the spectators.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: History of England. Vol. i. Chap. iii. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on america, fighting, men, and order

In order that he might rob a neighbour whom he had promised to defend, black men fought on the coast of Coromandel and red men scalped each other by the great lakes of North America.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Frederic the Great. 1842. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on bravery

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How well Horatius kept the bridge In the brave days of old.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: Lays of Ancient Rome. Horatius, lxx. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on generations, lies, quiet, and silence

In that temple of silence and reconciliation where the enmities of twenty generations lie buried, in the great Abbey which has during many ages afforded a quiet resting-place to those whose minds and bodies have been shattered by the contentions of the Great Hall.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Warren Hastings. 1841. (From His Essays.)

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A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on catholicism, church, and solitude

She [the Roman Catholic Church] may still exist in undiminished vigour when some traveller from New Zealand shall, in the midst of a vast solitude, take his stand on a broken arch of London Bridge to sketch the ruins of St. Paul's.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Ranke's History of the Popes. 1840. (From His Essays.)

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