Lord Byron

1788 - 1824

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on wonder

in

A schoolboy's tale, the wonder of an hour!

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto ii. Stanza 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on day

in

Parting day Dies like the dolphin, whom each pang imbues With a new colour as it gasps away, The last still loveliest, till-'t is gone, and all is gray.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 29.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on heart and hope

in

Such partings break the heart they fondly hope to heal.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto i. Stanza 10.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on prophets

Perverts the Prophets and purloins the Psalms.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: English Bards and Scotch Reviewers. Line 326.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

• The petrifactions of a plodding brain.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: English Bards and Scotch Reviewers.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on conscience, quiet, and serenity

A quiet conscience makes one so serene.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on quiet

in

This quiet sail is as a noiseless wing To waft me from distraction.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 85.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on hell and quiet

in

But quiet to quick bosoms is a hell.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 42.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on knowledge, needs, and reading

One of the pleasures of reading old letters is the knowledge that they need no answer.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on men and world

in

But 'midst the crowd, the hum, the shock of men, To hear, to see, to feel, and to possess, And roam along, the world's tired denizen, With none who bless us, none whom we can bless.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto ii. Stanza 26.

Contributed by: Zaady

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