Lord Byron

1788 - 1824

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on beauty, darkness, day, and heaven

She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that's best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes: Thus mellow'd to that tender light Which heaven to gaudy day denies.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: She Walks in Beauty

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

Sapping a solemn creed with solemn sneer.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 107.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on poetry and speech

The poetry of speech.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 58.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on change, darkness, strength, and women

The sky is changed,-and such a change! O night And storm and darkness! ye are wondrous strong, Yet lovely in your strength, as is the light Of a dark eye in woman! Far along, From peak to peak, the rattling crags among, Leaps the live thunder.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 92.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on adultery, climate, and men

What men call gallantry and gods adultery, Is much more common where the climate's sultry.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Don Juan

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

• The petrifactions of a plodding brain.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: English Bards and Scotch Reviewers.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on conscience, quiet, and serenity

A quiet conscience makes one so serene.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on quiet

in

This quiet sail is as a noiseless wing To waft me from distraction.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 85.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on hell and quiet

in

But quiet to quick bosoms is a hell.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 42.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on knowledge, needs, and reading

One of the pleasures of reading old letters is the knowledge that they need no answer.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

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