Lord Byron

1788 - 1824

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

Where'er we tread, 't is haunted, holy ground.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto ii. Stanza 88.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

Or whispering with white lips, "The foe! They come! they come!"

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 25.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on electricity

Striking the electric chain wherewith we are darkly bound.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 23.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on soul and thought

The dome of thought, the palace of the soul.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto ii. Stanza 6.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on thought and words

Words are things, and a small drop if ink, Falling like dew upon a thought, produces That which makes thousands, perhaps millions, think.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on art, life, and pain

The great art of life is the sensation, to feel that we exist, even in pain.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

A thousand years scarce serve to form a state: An hour may lay it in the dust.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto ii. Stanza 84.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on facts, nature, truth, and virtue

Yet truth will sometimes lend her noblest fires, And decorate the verse herself inspires: This fact, in virtue's name, let Crabbe attest,- Though Nature's sternest painter, yet the best.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: English Bards and Scotch Reviewers. Line 839.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

Ungrateful Florence! Dante sleeps afar, Like Scipio, buried by the upbraiding shore.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 57.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on beauty, darkness, day, and heaven

She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that's best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes: Thus mellow'd to that tender light Which heaven to gaudy day denies.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: She Walks in Beauty

Contributed by: Zaady

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