Lord Byron

1788 - 1824

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on good

in

My native land, good night!

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto i. Stanza 13.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on thought

in

None are so desolate but something dear, Dearer than self, possesses or possess'd A thought, and claims the homage of a tear.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto ii. Stanza 24.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

I stood Among them, but not of them; in a shroud Of thoughts which were not their thoughts.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 113.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

I stood in Venice on the Bridge of Sighs, A palace and a prison on each hand.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on nobility, privacy, and vices

I was accused of every monstrous vice by public rumour and private rancour; my name, which had been a knightly or noble one, was tainted. I felt that, if what was whispered, and muttered, and murmured, was true, I was unfit for England; if false, England was unfit for me.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on men

in

If ancient tales say true, nor wrong these holy men.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto i. Stanza 7.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on earth, heaven, hell, hope, and merit

In hope to merit heaven by making earth a hell.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto i. Stanza 20.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on solitude

In solitude, where we are least alone.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 90.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on beauty and gifts

Italia! O Italia! thou who hast The fatal gift of beauty.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 42.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on crime, deed, love, and sorrow

Know ye the land where the cypress and myrtle Are emblems of deeds that are done in their clime? Where the rage of the vulture, the love of the turtle, Now melt into sorrow, now madden to crime!

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: "The Bride of Abydos"

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content