Lord Byron

1788 - 1824

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on eternity, life, passion, people, poetry, and understanding

I can never get people to understand that poetry is the expression of excited passion, and that there is no such thing as a life of passion any more than a continuous earthquake, or an eternal fever. Besides, who would ever shave themselves in such a state?

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on thought and wisdom

Exhausting thought, And hiving wisdom with each studious year.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 107.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on departure, immortality, and worth

Fair Greece! sad relic of departed worth! Immortal, though no more! though fallen, great!

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto ii. Stanza 73.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on farewells and faults

Then farewell Horace, whom I hated so,- Not for thy faults, but mine.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 77.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on feeling and time

There are some feelings time cannot benumb, Nor torture shake.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 19.

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A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on art and sports

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. . . the art of angling, the cruelest, the coldest, and the stupidest of pretended sports.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

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A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on despair

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The nympholepsy of some fond despair.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 115.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on art, death, hope, and nations

Scion of chiefs and monarchs, where art thou? Fond hope of many nations, art thou dead? Could not the grave forget thee, and lay low Some less majestic, less beloved head?

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 168.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on automobiles, dance, joy, pleasure, sleep, and youth

But hush! hark! a deep sound strikes like a rising knell! Did ye not hear it?-No! 't was but the wind, Or the car rattling o'er the stony street. On with the dance! let joy be unconfined; No sleep till morn, when Youth and Pleasure meet To chase the glowing hours with flying feet.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 22.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on heart

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So the struck eagle, stretch'd upon the plain, No more through rolling clouds to soar again, View'd his own feather on the fatal dart, And wing'd the shaft that quiver'd in his heart.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: English Bards and Scotch Reviewers. Line 826. (see Thomas Moore)

Contributed by: Zaady

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