Lord Byron

1788 - 1824

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on art, death, hope, and nations

Scion of chiefs and monarchs, where art thou? Fond hope of many nations, art thou dead? Could not the grave forget thee, and lay low Some less majestic, less beloved head?

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 168.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on creation, heart, idealism, and mortality

Egeria! sweet creation of some heart Which found no mortal resting-place so fair As thine ideal breast.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 115.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

Tully was not so eloquent as thou, Thou nameless column with the buried base.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 110.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on mankind and mountains

He who ascends to mountain-tops shall find The loftiest peaks most wrapt in clouds and snow; He who surpasses or subdues mankind Must look down on the hate of those below.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 45.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

Since Eve ate the apple, much depends on dinner.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on eternity, life, passion, people, poetry, and understanding

I can never get people to understand that poetry is the expression of excited passion, and that there is no such thing as a life of passion any more than a continuous earthquake, or an eternal fever. Besides, who would ever shave themselves in such a state?

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on thought and wisdom

Exhausting thought, And hiving wisdom with each studious year.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 107.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on departure, immortality, and worth

Fair Greece! sad relic of departed worth! Immortal, though no more! though fallen, great!

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto ii. Stanza 73.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on change, earth, language, and time

The lapse of ages changes all things --time, language, the earth, the bounds of the sea, the stars of the sky, and every thing "about, around, and underneath" man, except man himself.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

Coop'd in their winged, sea-girt citadel.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto ii. Stanza 28.

Contributed by: Zaady

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