Lord Byron

1788 - 1824

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on earth and mortality

When Newton saw an apple fall, he found . . . A mode of proving that the earth turnd round In a most natural whirl, called gravitation; And thus is the sole mortal who could grapple Since Adam, with a fall or with an apple.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on happiness, history, and hunger

All human history attests That happiness for man, the hungry sinner! - Since Eve ate apples, much depends on dinner.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: The Island

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on heart

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And thus the heart will break, yet brokenly live on.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 32.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on death and heaven

Heaven gives its favourites-early death.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 102.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

I am as a weed Flung from the rock, on Ocean's foam to sail Where'er the surge may sweep, the tempest's breath prevail.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

And there was mounting in hot haste.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 25.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on farewells and faults

Then farewell Horace, whom I hated so,- Not for thy faults, but mine.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 77.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on feeling and time

There are some feelings time cannot benumb, Nor torture shake.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 19.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on art and sports

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. . . the art of angling, the cruelest, the coldest, and the stupidest of pretended sports.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on despair

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The nympholepsy of some fond despair.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 115.

Contributed by: Zaady

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