Lord Byron

1788 - 1824

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on sleep

in

Now I shall go to sleep. Goodnight.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on songs

in

I'll publish right or wrong. Fools are my theme, let satire be my song.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on bitterness and joy

Still from the fount of joy's delicious springs Some bitter o'er the flowers its bubbling venom flings.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto i. Stanza 82.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on freedom

in

Yet, Freedom! yet thy banner, torn, but flying, Streams like the thunder-storm against the wind.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 98.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on friendship and love

Friendship is Love without his wings!

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Hours of Idleness. L’Amitié

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A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

The starry Galileo with his woes.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 54.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

Tully was not so eloquent as thou, Thou nameless column with the buried base.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 110.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on mankind and mountains

He who ascends to mountain-tops shall find The loftiest peaks most wrapt in clouds and snow; He who surpasses or subdues mankind Must look down on the hate of those below.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 45.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

Since Eve ate the apple, much depends on dinner.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on eternity, life, passion, people, poetry, and understanding

I can never get people to understand that poetry is the expression of excited passion, and that there is no such thing as a life of passion any more than a continuous earthquake, or an eternal fever. Besides, who would ever shave themselves in such a state?

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

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