Lord Byron

1788 - 1824

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on happiness, history, and hunger

All human history attests That happiness for man, the hungry sinner! - Since Eve ate apples, much depends on dinner.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: The Island

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on heart

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And thus the heart will break, yet brokenly live on.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 32.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on death and heaven

Heaven gives its favourites-early death.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 102.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

I am as a weed Flung from the rock, on Ocean's foam to sail Where'er the surge may sweep, the tempest's breath prevail.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

And there was mounting in hot haste.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 25.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on mind and people

The mind can make Substance, and people planets of its own With beings brighter than have been, and give A breath to forms which can outlive all flesh

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on feeling and time

There are some feelings time cannot benumb, Nor torture shake.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 19.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on art and sports

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. . . the art of angling, the cruelest, the coldest, and the stupidest of pretended sports.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on despair

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The nympholepsy of some fond despair.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 115.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on art, death, hope, and nations

Scion of chiefs and monarchs, where art thou? Fond hope of many nations, art thou dead? Could not the grave forget thee, and lay low Some less majestic, less beloved head?

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 168.

Contributed by: Zaady

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