Lord Byron

1788 - 1824

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on bitterness and joy

Still from the fount of joy's delicious springs Some bitter o'er the flowers its bubbling venom flings.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto i. Stanza 82.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on freedom

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Yet, Freedom! yet thy banner, torn, but flying, Streams like the thunder-storm against the wind.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 98.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on friendship and love

Friendship is Love without his wings!

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Hours of Idleness. L’Amitié

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

The starry Galileo with his woes.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iv. Stanza 54.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on earth and mortality

When Newton saw an apple fall, he found . . . A mode of proving that the earth turnd round In a most natural whirl, called gravitation; And thus is the sole mortal who could grapple Since Adam, with a fall or with an apple.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on happiness, history, and hunger

All human history attests That happiness for man, the hungry sinner! - Since Eve ate apples, much depends on dinner.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: The Island

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron

Since Eve ate the apple, much depends on dinner.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on eternity, life, passion, people, poetry, and understanding

I can never get people to understand that poetry is the expression of excited passion, and that there is no such thing as a life of passion any more than a continuous earthquake, or an eternal fever. Besides, who would ever shave themselves in such a state?

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on thought and wisdom

Exhausting thought, And hiving wisdom with each studious year.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto iii. Stanza 107.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on departure, immortality, and worth

Fair Greece! sad relic of departed worth! Immortal, though no more! though fallen, great!

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto ii. Stanza 73.

Contributed by: Zaady

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