Lord Alfred Tennyson

1809 - 1892

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on god and love

in

God gives us love. Something to love He lends us; but when love is grown To ripeness, that on which it throve Falls off, and love is left alone.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: To J. S.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on dogs, force, horses, novelty, and passion

He will hold thee, when his passion shall have spent its novel force, Something better than his dog, a little dearer than his horse.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: Line 49.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on death and reason

Some one had blunder'd: Theirs not to make reply, Theirs not to reason why, Theirs but to do and die.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: Stanza 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on fighting, lies, and truth

That a lie which is all a lie may be met and fought with outright, But a lie which is part a truth is a harder matter to fight.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: The Grandmother

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on poets, sorrow, and truth

This is truth the poet sings, That a sorrow's crown of sorrow is remembering happier things.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON

O damned vacillating state!

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: Supposed Confessions, 1830, last line

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on death

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All in the valley of death Rode the six hundred.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: The Charge of the Light Brigade. Stanza 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on wine

in

Across the walnuts and the wine.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: The Miller's Daughter.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON

Be near me when my light is low.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: Memoriam, 1850

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on friendship, judgment, justice, and silence

He that wrongs a friend Wrongs himself more, and ever bears about A silent court of justice in his breast, Himself the judge and jury, and himself The prisoner at the bar ever condemned.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Contributed by: Zaady

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