Lord Alfred Tennyson

1809 - 1892

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on clarity, darkness, farewells, home, hope, and time

Sunset and evening star, And one clear call for me! And may there be no moaning of the bar, When I put out to sea, But such a tide as moving seems asleep, To full for sound and foam, When that which drew from out the boundless deep Turns again home. Twilight and evening bell, And after that the dark! And may there be no sadness of farewell, When I embark; For though from out our bourne of Time and Place The flood may bear me far, I hope to see my Pilot face to face When I have crossed the bar.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: Crossing the Bar

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on death and hell

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Cannon to right of them, Cannon to left of them, Cannon in front of them. . . . . Into the jaws of death, Into the mouth of hell Rode the six hundred.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: Charge of the Light Brigade, 4Stanza 3.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on action and despair

I must lose myself in action, lest I wither in despair.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on age and deed

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I know that age to age succeeds, Blowing a noise of tongues and deeds, A dust of systems and of creeds.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: The Two Voices, 1832

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on time

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I, the heir of all the ages, in the foremost files of time.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: Locksley Hall, 1842, line 178.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on loneliness

Weeded and worn the ancient thatch Upon the lonely moated grange.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: Mariana, 1830

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on death

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She said, "I am aweary, aweary, I would that I were dead!"

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: Mariana, refrain

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on day, motherhood, and time

You must wake and call me early, call me early, mother dear; To-morrow'll be the happiest time of all the glad New Year,- Of all the glad New Year, mother, the maddest, merriest day; For I'm to be Queen o' the May, mother, I'm to be queen o' the May.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: The May Queen.

Contributed by: Zaady

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