Lao Tzu

c.604 - 531 B.C.

A Quote by Lao Tzu on tao, death, flexibilitly, and life

Men are born soft and supple;
dead, they are stiff and hard.
Plats are born tender and pliant;
dead, they are brittle and dry.

Thus whoever is stiff and inflexible
is a disciple of death.
Whoever is soft and yielding
is a disciple of life.

The hard and stiff will be broken.
The soft and supple will prevail.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: Tao Te Ching

Contributed by: Gaia Team

A Quote by Lao Tzu on tao, mastery, leadership, and competition

All streams flow to the sea
because it is lower than they are.
Humility gives it its power.

If you want to govern the people,
you must place yourself below them.
If you want to lead the people,
you must learn how to follow them.

The Master is above the people,
and no one feels oppressed.
She goes ahead of the people,
and no one feels manipulated.
The whole world is grateful to her.
Because she competes with no one,
no one can compete with her.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: Tao Te Ching

Contributed by: Gaia Team

A Quote by Lao Tzu on tao, simplicity, patience, compassion, action, and thoughts

Some say that my teaching is nonsense.
Others call it lofty but impractical.
But to those who have looked inside themselves,
this nonsense makes perfect sense.
And to those who put it into practice,
this loftiness has roots that go deep.

I have just three things to teach:
simplicity, patience, compassion.
These three are your greatest treasures.
Simple in actions and in thoughts,
you return to the source of being.
Patient with both friends and enemies,
you accord with the way things are.
Compassionate toward yourself,
you reconcile all beings in the world.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: Tao Te Ching

Contributed by: Gaia Team

A Quote by Lao Tzu on tao, excellence, competition, and harmony

The best athlete
wants his opponent at his best.
The best general
enters the mind of his enemy.
The best businessman
serves the communal good.
The best leader
follows the will of the people.

All of the embody
the virtue of non-competition.
Not that they don't love to compete,
but they do it in the spirit of play.
In this they are like children
and in harmony with the Tao.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: Tao Te Ching

Contributed by: Gaia Team

A Quote by Lao Tzu on tao, enemy, victory, forces, and opposition

The generals have a saying:
"Rather than make the first move
it is better to wait and see.
Rather than advance an inch
it is better to retreat a yard."

This is called
going forward without advancing,
pushing back without using weapons.

There is no greater misfortune
than underestimating your enemy.
Underestimating your enemy
means thinking that he is evil.
Thus you destroy your three treasures
and become an enemy yourself.

When two great forces oppose each other,
the victory will go
to the one that knows how to yield.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: Tao Te Ching

Contributed by: Gaia Team

A Quote by Lao Tzu on teachings, tao, heart, and understanding

My teachings are easy to understand
and easy to put into practice.
Yet your intellect will never grasp them,
and if you try to practice them, you'll fail.

My teachings are older than the world.
How can you grasp their meaning?

If you want to know me,
look inside your heart.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: Tao Te Ching

Contributed by: Gaia Team

A Quote by Lao Tzu on tao, knowing, disease, mastery, and knowledge

Not-knowing is true knowledge.
Presuming to know is a disease.
First realize that you are sick;
then you can move toward health.

The Master is her own physician.
She has healed herself of all knowing.
Thus she is truly whole.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: Tao Te Ching

Contributed by: Gaia Team

A Quote by Lao Tzu on awe, tao, religion, mastery, and trust

When they lose their sense of awe,
people turn to religion.
When they no longer trust themselves,
they begin to depend upon authority.

Therefore the Master steps back
so that people won't be confused.
He teaches without a teaching,
so that people will have nothing to learn.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: Tao Te Ching

Contributed by: Gaia Team

A Quote by Lao Tzu on tao, power, and politics

When a country obtains great power,
it becomes like the sea:
all streams run downward into it.
The more powerful it grows,
the greater the need for humility.
Humility means trusting the Tao,
thus never needing to be defensive.

A great nation is like a great man:
When he makes a mistake, he realizes it.
Having realized it, he admits it.
Having admitted it, he corrects it.
He considers those who point out his faults
as his most benevolent teachers.
He thinks of his enemy
as the shadow that he himself casts.

If a nation is centered in the Tao,
if it nourishes its own people
and doesn't meddle in the affairs of others,
it will be a light to all nations in the world.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: Tao Te Ching

Contributed by: Gaia Team

A Quote by Lao Tzu on tao, universe, and mastery

The Tao is the center of the universe,
the good man's treasure,
the bad man's refuge.

Honors can be bought with fine words,
respect can be won with good deeds;
but the Tao is beyond all value,
and no one can achieve it.

Thus, when a new leader is chosen,
don't offer to help him
with your wealth or your expertise.
Offer instead
to teach him about the Tao.

Why did the ancient Masters esteem the Tao?
Because, being one with the Tao,
when you seek, you find;
and when you make a mistake, you are forgiven.
That is why everybody loves it.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: Tao Te Ching

Contributed by: Gaia Team

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