Lady Mary Wortley Montagu

1690 - 1762

A Quote by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu on youth, age, and wisdom

'Tis a maxim with me to be young as long as one can: there is nothing can pay one for that invaluable ignorance which is the companion of youth; those sanguine groundless hopes, and that lively vanity, which make all the happiness of life. To my extreme mortification I grow wiser every day.

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1690 - 1762)

Source: The Complete Letters of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu

You can be pleased with nothing if you are not pleased with yourself.

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1690 - 1762)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu on entertainment, pleasure, and reading

No entertainment is so cheap as reading, nor any pleasure so lasting.

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1690 - 1762)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu on advice

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I sometimes give myself admirable advice, but I am incapable of taking it.

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1690 - 1762)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu on people and pleasure

I despise the pleasure of pleasing people that I despise.

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1690 - 1762)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu

But the fruit that can fall without shaking Indeed is too mellow for me.

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1690 - 1762)

Source: The Answer.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu on guidance, maxims, and virtue

Let this great maxim be my virtue's guide,- In part she is to blame that has been tried: He comes too near that comes to be denied.

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1690 - 1762)

Source: The Lady's Resolve, (1713)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu

Satire should, like a polished razor keen, Would with a touch that 's scarcely felt or seen.

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1690 - 1762)

Source: To the Imitator of the First Satire of Horace. Book ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu on knowledge, life, mind, vices, and virtue

Whoever will cultivate their own mind will find full employment. Every virtue does not only require great care in the planting, but as much daily solicitude in cherishing as exotic fruits and flowers; the vices and passions (which I am afraid are the natural product of the soil) demand perpetual weeding. Add to this the search after knowledge. . . and the longest life is too short.

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1690 - 1762)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu

And we meet, with champagne and a chicken, at last.

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1690 - 1762)

Source: The Lover.

Contributed by: Zaady

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