Joseph Addison

1672 - 1719

A Quote by Joseph Addison on beauty and soul

There is nothing that makes its way more directly to the soul than beauty.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on belief, stupidity, truth, and virtue

A man must be both stupid and uncharitable who believes there is no virtue or truth but on his own side.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on garden, songs, and value

I value my garden more for being full of blackbirds than of cherries, and very frankly give them fruit for their songs.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Source: The Spectator

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on good, humanity, and life

What sunshine is to flowers, smiles are to humanity. These are but trifles, to be sure; but, scattered along life's pathway, the good they do is inconceivable.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison

Arguments out of a pretty mouth are unanswerable.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on architecture, music, and painting

A man that has a taste of music, painting, or architecture, is like one that has another sense, when compared with such as have no relish of those arts.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on atheism and faith

To be an atheist requires an indefinitely greater measure of faith than to receive all the great truths which atheism would deny.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on aim, moderation, and zeal

Whether zeal or moderation be the point we aim at, let us keep the fire out of the one, and the frost out of the other.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on mind and power

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Nothing is more gratifying to the mind of man than power or dominance.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on contentment, good, men, privacy, and vices

Content thyself to be obscurely good. When vice prevails, and impious men bear sway, the post of honoris a private station.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Source: Cato

Contributed by: Zaady

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