Joseph Addison

1672 - 1719

A Quote by Joseph Addison on mind and water

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Our disputants put me in mind of the skuttle fish, that when he is unable to extricate himself, blackens all the water about him, till he becomes invisible.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Source: The Spectator

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on age, death, existence, immortality, life, nature, soul, war, and youth

I 'm weary of conjectures,-this must end 'em. Thus am I doubly armed: my death and life, My bane and antidote, are both before me: This in a moment brings me to an end; But this informs me I shall never die. The soul, secured in her existence, smiles At the drawn dagger, and defies its point. The stars shall fade away, the sun himself Grow dim with age, and Nature sink in years; But thou shalt flourish in immortal youth, Unhurt amidst the war of elements, The wrecks of matter, and the crush of worlds.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Source: Cato. Act v. Sc. 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on body, conscience, good, health, serenity, and soul

A good conscience is to the soul what health is to the body; it preserves a constant ease and serenity within us, and more than countervails all the calamities and afflictions that can possibly befall us.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on heart and world

A man's first care should be to avoid the reproaches of his own heart, and his next to escape the censures of the world.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison

Much may be said on both sides.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Source: Spectator. No. 122.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on argument, doubt, gold, philosophy, reason, understanding, and wisdom

A man who is furnished with arguments from the mint, will convince his antagonist much sooner than one who draws them from reason and philosophy. - Gold is a wonderful clearer of the understanding; it dissipates every doubt and scruple in an instant; accommodates itself to the meanest capacities; silences the loud and clamorous, and cringes over the most obstinate and inflexible. - Philip of Macedon was a man of most invincible reason this way. He refuted by it all the wisdom of Athens; confounded their statesmen; struck their orators dumb; and at length argued them out of all their liberties.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on complaints, conversation, ideas, laughter, and life

It is very wonderful to see persons of the best sense passing hours together in shuffling and dividing a pack of cards with no conversation but what is made up of a few game-phrases, and no other ideas but those of black or red spots arranged together in different figures. Would not a man laugh to hear any one of his species complaining that life is short?

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on beauty and soul

There is nothing that makes its way more directly to the soul than beauty.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on belief, stupidity, truth, and virtue

A man must be both stupid and uncharitable who believes there is no virtue or truth but on his own side.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on garden, songs, and value

I value my garden more for being full of blackbirds than of cherries, and very frankly give them fruit for their songs.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Source: The Spectator

Contributed by: Zaady

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