Jonathan Safran Foer

A Quote by Jonathan Safran Foer on vegan

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Murdering someone would surely prove that you are capable of killing, but it wouldn’t be the most reasonable way to understand why you shouldn’t do it.

Jonathan Safran Foer

Source: Eating Animals

Contributed by: Louëlla

A Quote by Jonathan Safran Foer on words, language, and writing

"Words never mean what we want them to mean"

Jonathan Safran Foer

Source: Everything Is Illuminated: A Novel

Contributed by: Lisa

A Quote by Jonathan Safran Foer on observations, sadness, and life

"SADNESSES OF THE INTELLECT: Sadness of being misunderstood [sic]; Humor sadness; Sadness of love wit[hou]t release; Sadne[ss of be]ing smart; Sadness of not knowing enough words to [express what you mean]; Sadness of having options; Sadness of wanting sadness; Sadness of confusion; Sadness of domes[tic]ated birds; Sadness of fini[shi]ng a book; Sadness of remembering; Sadness of forgetting; Anxiety sadness..."

Jonathan Safran Foer

Source: Everything Is Illuminated: A Novel

Contributed by: Lisa

A Quote by Jonathan Safran Foer

 I read the first chapter of A Brief History of Time when Dad was still alive, and I got increadibly heavy boots about how relatively insignificant life is, and how compared to the universe and compared to time, it didn't even matter if I existed at all.  When Dad was tucking me in that night and we were talking about the book, I asked if he could think of a solution to that problem.  "Which problem?"  "The problem of how relatively insignificant we are."  He said, "Well, what would happen if a plane dropped you in the middle of the Sahara Desert and you picked up a single grain of sand with tweezers and moved it one millimeter?"  I said, "I'd probably die of dehydration."  He said, "I just mean right then, when you moved that single grain of sand.  What would that mean?"  I said, "I dunno, what?"  He said, "Think about it."  I thought about it.  "I guess I would have moved one grain of sand."  "Which would mean?"  "Which would mean I moved a grain of sand?"  "Which would mean you changed the Sahara."  "So?"  "So?  So the Sahara is a vast desert.  And it has existed for millions of years.  And you changed it!"  "That's true!"  I said, sitting up.  "I changed the Sahara!"  "Which means?"  he said.  "What?  Tell me."  "Well I'm not talking about painting the Mona Lisa  or curing cancer.  I'm just talking about moving that one grain of sand one millimeter."  "Yeah?"  "If you hadn't done it, human history would have been one way..."  "Uh-huh?"  "But you did do it, so...?"  I stood on the bed, pointing one of my fingers at the fake stars, and screamed: "I changed the course of human history!"  "That's right."  "I changed the universe!"  "You did." "I'm God!"  "You're an atheist."  "I don't exist!"  I feel back onto the bed, into his arms, and we cracked up together.

Jonathan Safran Foer

Source: Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close: A Novel, Pages: 86

Contributed by: Allison

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