John Updike

1932 -

A Quote by John Updike on existence, horrible, experience, ecstasy, feel, and life

Existence itself does not feel horrible; it feels like an ecstasy, rather, which we have only to be still to experience.

John Updike (1932 -)

Contributed by: Joy Bringer

A Quote by John Updike on america, happy, happiness, conspiracy, vast, truth, and humor

America is a vast conspiracy to make you happy.

John Updike (1932 -)

Contributed by: Joy Bringer

A Quote by John Updike on love, alive, aliveness, live, and we are

We are most alive when we’re in love.

John Updike (1932 -)

Contributed by: Joy Bringer

A Quote by John Updike on art, space, spirit, breathing, offer, offering, and artistic

What art offers is space - a certain breathing room for the spirit.

John Updike (1932 -)

Contributed by: Joy Bringer

A Quote by John Updike on being, naked, revolutionary, populism, barefoot, nakedness, and bare

Being naked approaches being revolutionary; going barefoot is mere populism.

John Updike (1932 -)

Contributed by: Joy Bringer

A Quote by John Updike on sex and money

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Sex is like money; only too much is enough.

John Updike (1932 -)

Contributed by: James Brown

A Quote by John Updike on earth, grace, and life

Rain is grace; rain is the sky condescending to the earth; without rain, there would be no life.

John Updike (1932 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Updike on children

The crooked little tomato branches, pulpy and pale as if made of cheap green paper, broke under the weight of so much fruit; there was something frantic in such fertility, a crying-out like that of children frantic to please.

John Updike (1932 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Updike on birds and departure

The stripped and shapely Maple grieves The ghosts of her Departed leaves. The ground is hard, As hard as stone. The year is old, The birds are flown.

John Updike (1932 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Updike on creation, enemies, and extremism

Perfectionism is the enemy of creation, as extreme self-solicitude is the enemy of well-being.

John Updike (1932 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

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