John Quincy Adams

1767 - 1848

A Quote by John Quincy Adams on gold, songs, and wishes

THE WANTS OF MAN 'Man wants but little here below, Nor wants that little long.'* 'Tis not with me exactly so, But 'tis so in the song. My wants are many, and if told Would muster many a score; And were each wish a mint of gold, I still should long for more. *from Oliver Goldsmith's Hermit.

John Quincy Adams (1767 - 1848)

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A Quote by John Quincy Adams on ambition, america, assumptions, change, colors, destruction, envy, force, freedom, heart, independence, individuality, interest, liberty, maxims, power, spirit, sympathy, and world

Wherever the standard of freedom and independence has been or shall be unfurled, there will her [America's] heart, her benedictions and her prayers be. But she goes not abroad in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own. She will recommend the general cause, by the countenance of her voice, and the benignant sympathy of her example. She well knows that by once enlisting under other banners than her own, were they even the banners of foreign independence, she would involve herself, beyond the power of extrication, in all the wars of interest and intrigue, of individual avarice, envy, and ambition, which assume the colors and usurp the standard of freedom. The fundamental maxims of her policy would insensibly change from liberty to force. . . . She might become the dictatress of the world: she would be no longer the ruler of her own spirit. This appears with minor variations in punctuation and with italics in the phrase "change from liberty to force," in John Quincy Adams and American Continental Empire, ed. Walter LaFeber, p. 45 (1965).

John Quincy Adams (1767 - 1848)

Source: An Address…. Celebrating the Anniversary of Independence, at the City of Washington on the Fourth of July 1821…, p. 32 (1821).

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A Quote by John Quincy Adams on difficulty, magic, obstacles, patience, and perseverance

Patience and perseverance have a magical effect before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish.

John Quincy Adams (1767 - 1848)

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A Quote by John Quincy Adams on books, day, life, men, necessity, and world

I speak as a man of the world to men of the world; and I say to you, Search the Scriptures! The Bible is the book of all others, to be read at all ages, and in all conditions of human life; not to be read once or twice or thrice through, and then laid aside, but to be read in small portions of one or two chapters every day, and never to be intermitted, unless by some overruling necessity.

John Quincy Adams (1767 - 1848)

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A Quote by John Quincy Adams on history, knowledge, morality, and virtue

In what light soever we regard the Bible, whether with reference to revelation, to history, or to morality, it is an invaluable and inexhaustible mine of knowledge and virtue.

John Quincy Adams (1767 - 1848)

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A Quote by John Quincy Adams on children, citizenship, confidence, country, hope, and society

So great is my veneration for the Bible, that the earlier my children begin to read it the more confident will be my hopes that they will prove useful citizens to their country and respectable members of society.

John Quincy Adams (1767 - 1848)

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A Quote by John Quincy Adams on charity, mankind, and men

In charity to all mankind, bearing no malice or ill-will to any human being, and even compassionating those who hold in bondage their fellow-men, not knowing what they do.

John Quincy Adams (1767 - 1848)

Source: Letter to A. Bronson. July 30, 1838.

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A Quote by John Quincy Adams on courage, difficulty, magic, obstacles, and perseverance

Courage and perseverance have a magical talisman, before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish into air.

John Quincy Adams (1767 - 1848)

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A Quote by John Quincy Adams on posterity

Think of your forefathers! Think of your posterity!

John Quincy Adams (1767 - 1848)

Source: Speech at Plymouth, Dec. 22, 1802.

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A Quote by John Quincy Adams on deals, freedom, and peace

This hand, to tyrants ever sworn the foe, For Freedom only deals the deadly blow; Then sheathes in calm repose the vengeful blade, For gentle peace in Freedom's hallowed shade.

John Quincy Adams (1767 - 1848)

Source: Written in an Album, 1842.

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