John Milton

1608 - 1674

A Quote by John Milton on philosophy and wisdom

Vain wisdom all, and false philosophy.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book ii. Line 565.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on books, fatherhood, learning, lies, motherhood, mountains, purity, saints, truth, and tyranny

Avenge, O Lord, Thy slaughtered saints, whose bones Lie scattered on the Alpine mountains cold; Ev'n them who kept Thy truth so pure of old, When all our fathers worshipped stocks and stones, Forget not: In Thy book record their groans Who were Thy sheep, and in their ancient fold Slain by the bloody Piemontese that rolled Mother with infant down the rocks. Their moans The vales redoubled to the hills, and they To Heav'n. Their martyred blood and ashes sow O'er all th' Italian fields, where still doth sway The triple tyrant; that from these may grow A hundred-fold, who having learned Thy way Early may fly the Babylonian woe.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XVIII, On the late Massacre in Piemont

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A Quote by John Milton on good and men

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None But such as are good men can give good things, And that which is not good, is not delicious To a well-govern'd and wise appetite.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Comus

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A Quote by John Milton on paradise

Then wilt thou not be loath To leave this Paradise, but shalt possess A Paradise within thee, happier far.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost

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A Quote by John Milton on heaven and hell

Better to rule in Hell than to serve in Heaven.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on heaven and hell

Better to reign in hell than serve in heaven.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on angels, evil, god, and hypocrisy

For neither man nor angel can discern Hypocrisy, the only evil that walks Invisible, except to God alone.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on argument, blindness, clarity, conscience, contentment, day, friendship, guidance, heart, hope, idleness, liberty, losing, nobility, thought, women, and world

Cyriac, this three years' day these eyes, though clear, To outward view, of blemish or of spot, Bereft of light, their seeing have forgot; Nor to their idle orbs doth sight appear Of sun, or moon, or star, throughout the year, Or man, or woman. Yet I argue not Against Heav'n's hand or will, nor bate a jot Of heart or hope; but still bear up and steer Right onward. What supports me, dost thou ask? The conscience, Friend, t' have lost them overplied In liberty's defence, my noble task, Of which all Europe rings from side to side. This thought might lead me through the world's vain mask Content, though blind, had I no better guide.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XXII, To The Same (Cyriac Skinner)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on deed, justice, and words

Just deeds are the best answer to injurious words.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on desires, good, knowledge, learning, men, necessity, and writing

Where there is much desire to learn, there of necessity will be much arguing, much writing, many opinions; for opinion in good men is but knowledge in the making.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Areopagitica

Contributed by: Zaady

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