John Milton

1608 - 1674

A Quote by John Milton on boldness, gold, learning, peace, power, religion, sage, sons, spirituality, and war

Vane, young in years, but in sage counsel old, Than whom a better senator ne'er held The helm of Rome, when gowns, not arms, repelled The fierce Epirot and the African bold, Whether to settle peace, or to unfold The drift of hollow states hard to be spelled, Then to advise how war may, best upheld, Move by her two main nerves, iron and gold, In all her equipage; besides to know Both spiritual power and civil, what each means, What severs each, thou hast learned, which few have done: The bounds of either sword to thee we owe: Therefore on thy firm hand Religion leans In peace, and reckons thee her eldest son.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XVII, To Sir Henry Vane the Younger

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on beginning, birds, charm, day, earth, gloom, inferiority, influence, kiss, needs, peace, shame, wonder, world, and elightenment

But peaceful was the night Wherein the Prince of Light His reign of peace upon the earth began. The winds with wonder whist, Smoothly the waters kiss, Whispering new joys to the mild Ocean,- Who now hath quite forgot to rave, While birds of calm sit brooding on the charmed wave. The stars, with deep amaze, Stand fixed in steadfast gaze, Bending one way their precious influence; And will not take their flight, For all the morning light, Or Lucifer that often warmed them thence; But in their glimmering orbs did glow, Until their Lord himself bespake, and bid them go. And, though the shady gloom Had given day her room, The sun himself withheld his wonted speed, And hid his head for shame, As his inferior flame The new-enlightened world no more should need: He saw a greater Sun appear Than his bright throne or burning axeltree could bear.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: The Peaceful Night

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on cheerfulness, day, god, good, laws, learning, life, repentance, rest, and time

Cyriac, whose grandsire on the royal bench Of British Themis, with no mean applause Pronounced and in his volumes taught our laws, Which others at their bar so often wrench; Today deep thoughts resolve with me to drench In mirth, that after no repenting draws; Let Euclid rest and Archimedes pause, And what the Swede intends, and what the French. To measure life learn thou betimes, and know Toward solid good what leads the nearest way; For other things mild Heav'n a time ordains, And disapproves that care, though wise in show, That with superfluous burden loads the day, And, when God sends a cheerful hour, refrains.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XXI, To Cyriac Skinner

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on contentment, daughters, fatherhood, gold, good, judgment, liberty, life, nobility, parliament, praise, presidency, victory, and words

Daughter to that good Earl, once President Of England's Council, and her Treasury, Who lived in both, unstained with gold or fee, And left them both, more in himself content, Till sad the breaking of that Parliament Broke him, as that dishonest victory At Chaeronea, fatal to liberty, Killed with report that old man eloquent. Though later born than to have known the days Wherein your father flourished, yet by you, Madam, methinks I see him living yet; So well your words his noble virtues praise, That all both judge you to relate them true, And to possess them, honoured Margaret.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet X, To the Lady Margaret Ley

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on abstinence, christianity, immortality, innocence, praise, vices, virtue, and world

He that can apprehend and consider vice with all her baits and seeming pleasures, and yet abstain, and yet distinguish, and yet prefer that which is truly better, he is the true wayfaring Christian. I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race, where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat. Assuredly we bring not innocence into the world, we bring impurity much rather: that which purifies us is trial, and trial is by what is contrary.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Areopagitica

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on age, envy, fame, honor, justice, music, praise, skill, songs, words, and worth

Harry, whose tuneful and well-measured song First taught our English music how to span Words with just note and accent, not to scan With Midas' ears, committing short and long, Thy worth and skill exempts thee from the throng, With praise enough for envy to look wan; To after age thou shalt be writ the man That with smooth air couldst humour best our tongue. Thou honour'st verse, and verse must lend her wing To honour thee, the priest of Phoebus' choir, That tun'st their happiest lines in hymn or story. Dante shall give Fame leave to set thee higher Than his Casella, whom he wooed to sing, Met in the milder shades of Purgatory.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XIII, To Mr H. Lawes on the Publishing His Airs

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on choice, day, earth, fatherhood, immortality, inspiration, judgment, seasons, sons, time, virtue, and wine

Lawrence, of virtuous father virtuous son, Now that the fields are dank, and ways are mire, Where shall we sometimes meet, and by the fire Help waste a sullen day, what may be won From the hard season gaining? Time will run On smoother, till Favonius re-inspire The frozen earth, and clothe in fresh attire The lily and rose, that neither sowed nor spun. What neat repast shall feast us, light and choice, Of Attic taste, with wine, whence we may rise To hear the lute well touched, or artful voice Warble immortal notes and Tuscan air? He who of those delights can judge, and spare To interpose them oft, is not unwise.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XX, To Mr Lawrence

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on anger, art, bliss, deed, friendship, hope, pity, purity, shame, truth, and youth

Lady, that in the prime of earliest youth Wisely hast shunned the broad way and the green, And with those few art eminently seen, That labour up the hill of heavenly truth, The better part with Mary and with Ruth Chosen thou hast; and they that overween, And at thy growing virtues fret their spleen, No anger find in thee, but pity and ruth. Thy care is fixed, and zealously attends To fill thy odorous lamp with deeds of light, And hope that reaps not shame. Therefore be sure Thou, when the Bridegroom with His feastful friends Passes to bliss at the mid hour of night, Hast gained thy entrance, Virgin wise and pure.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet IX: To a Virtuous Young Lady

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on force and overcoming

Who overcomes By force, hath overcome but half his foe.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book i. Line 648.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on church and god

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God is decreeing to begin some new and great period in His Church, even to the reforming of Reformation itself. What does He then but reveal Himself to His servants, and as His manner is, first to His Englishmen?

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Areopagitica

Contributed by: Zaady

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