John Milton

1608 - 1674

A Quote by John Milton on choice, day, earth, fatherhood, immortality, inspiration, judgment, seasons, sons, time, virtue, and wine

Lawrence, of virtuous father virtuous son, Now that the fields are dank, and ways are mire, Where shall we sometimes meet, and by the fire Help waste a sullen day, what may be won From the hard season gaining? Time will run On smoother, till Favonius re-inspire The frozen earth, and clothe in fresh attire The lily and rose, that neither sowed nor spun. What neat repast shall feast us, light and choice, Of Attic taste, with wine, whence we may rise To hear the lute well touched, or artful voice Warble immortal notes and Tuscan air? He who of those delights can judge, and spare To interpose them oft, is not unwise.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XX, To Mr Lawrence

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on anger, art, bliss, deed, friendship, hope, pity, purity, shame, truth, and youth

Lady, that in the prime of earliest youth Wisely hast shunned the broad way and the green, And with those few art eminently seen, That labour up the hill of heavenly truth, The better part with Mary and with Ruth Chosen thou hast; and they that overween, And at thy growing virtues fret their spleen, No anger find in thee, but pity and ruth. Thy care is fixed, and zealously attends To fill thy odorous lamp with deeds of light, And hope that reaps not shame. Therefore be sure Thou, when the Bridegroom with His feastful friends Passes to bliss at the mid hour of night, Hast gained thy entrance, Virgin wise and pure.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet IX: To a Virtuous Young Lady

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on force and overcoming

Who overcomes By force, hath overcome but half his foe.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book i. Line 648.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on lies, life, and wisdom

Not to know at large of things remote From us, obscure and subtle, but to know That which before us lies in daily life Is the prime wisdom.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on rhetoric and wit

Enjoy your dear wit and gay rhetoric, That hath so well been taught her dazzling fence.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Comus. Line 790.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on mind

in

A grateful mind By owing owes not, but still pays, at once Indebted and discharg'd.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book iv. Line 55.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on earth and heaven

A heaven on earth.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book iv. Line 208.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on boldness, gold, learning, peace, power, religion, sage, sons, spirituality, and war

Vane, young in years, but in sage counsel old, Than whom a better senator ne'er held The helm of Rome, when gowns, not arms, repelled The fierce Epirot and the African bold, Whether to settle peace, or to unfold The drift of hollow states hard to be spelled, Then to advise how war may, best upheld, Move by her two main nerves, iron and gold, In all her equipage; besides to know Both spiritual power and civil, what each means, What severs each, thou hast learned, which few have done: The bounds of either sword to thee we owe: Therefore on thy firm hand Religion leans In peace, and reckons thee her eldest son.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XVII, To Sir Henry Vane the Younger

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on beginning, birds, charm, day, earth, gloom, inferiority, influence, kiss, needs, peace, shame, wonder, world, and elightenment

But peaceful was the night Wherein the Prince of Light His reign of peace upon the earth began. The winds with wonder whist, Smoothly the waters kiss, Whispering new joys to the mild Ocean,- Who now hath quite forgot to rave, While birds of calm sit brooding on the charmed wave. The stars, with deep amaze, Stand fixed in steadfast gaze, Bending one way their precious influence; And will not take their flight, For all the morning light, Or Lucifer that often warmed them thence; But in their glimmering orbs did glow, Until their Lord himself bespake, and bid them go. And, though the shady gloom Had given day her room, The sun himself withheld his wonted speed, And hid his head for shame, As his inferior flame The new-enlightened world no more should need: He saw a greater Sun appear Than his bright throne or burning axeltree could bear.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: The Peaceful Night

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on art, earth, god, happiness, obedience, and sons

Son of Heav'n and Earth, Attend: that thou art happy, owe to God; That thou continuest such, owe to thyself, That is, to thy obedience; therein stand.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost

Contributed by: Zaady

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