John Milton

1608 - 1674

A Quote by John Milton on heaven, hell, mind, and time

A mind not to be chang'd by place or time. The mind is its own place, and in itself Can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton

A pillar'd shade High overarch'd, and echoing walks between.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book ix. Line 1106.

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A Quote by John Milton on poets and reason

A poet soaring in the high reason of his fancies, with his garland and singing robes about him.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: The Reason of Church Government. Introduction, Book ii.

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A Quote by John Milton on memory, men, and names

A thousand fantasies Begin to throng into my memory, Of calling shapes, and beck'ning shadows dire, And airy tongues that syllable men's names On sands and shores and desert wildernesses.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Comus. Line 205.

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A Quote by John Milton on wilderness

A wilderness of sweets.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book v. Line 294.

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A Quote by John Milton on devil, goodness, and virtue

Abash'd the devil stood, And felt how awful goodness is, and saw Virtue in her shape how lovely.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book iv. Line 846.

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A Quote by John Milton on contentment, daughters, fatherhood, gold, good, judgment, liberty, life, nobility, parliament, praise, presidency, victory, and words

Daughter to that good Earl, once President Of England's Council, and her Treasury, Who lived in both, unstained with gold or fee, And left them both, more in himself content, Till sad the breaking of that Parliament Broke him, as that dishonest victory At Chaeronea, fatal to liberty, Killed with report that old man eloquent. Though later born than to have known the days Wherein your father flourished, yet by you, Madam, methinks I see him living yet; So well your words his noble virtues praise, That all both judge you to relate them true, And to possess them, honoured Margaret.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet X, To the Lady Margaret Ley

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A Quote by John Milton on abstinence, christianity, immortality, innocence, praise, vices, virtue, and world

He that can apprehend and consider vice with all her baits and seeming pleasures, and yet abstain, and yet distinguish, and yet prefer that which is truly better, he is the true wayfaring Christian. I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race, where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat. Assuredly we bring not innocence into the world, we bring impurity much rather: that which purifies us is trial, and trial is by what is contrary.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Areopagitica

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A Quote by John Milton on age, envy, fame, honor, justice, music, praise, skill, songs, words, and worth

Harry, whose tuneful and well-measured song First taught our English music how to span Words with just note and accent, not to scan With Midas' ears, committing short and long, Thy worth and skill exempts thee from the throng, With praise enough for envy to look wan; To after age thou shalt be writ the man That with smooth air couldst humour best our tongue. Thou honour'st verse, and verse must lend her wing To honour thee, the priest of Phoebus' choir, That tun'st their happiest lines in hymn or story. Dante shall give Fame leave to set thee higher Than his Casella, whom he wooed to sing, Met in the milder shades of Purgatory.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XIII, To Mr H. Lawes on the Publishing His Airs

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A Quote by John Milton on choice, day, earth, fatherhood, immortality, inspiration, judgment, seasons, sons, time, virtue, and wine

Lawrence, of virtuous father virtuous son, Now that the fields are dank, and ways are mire, Where shall we sometimes meet, and by the fire Help waste a sullen day, what may be won From the hard season gaining? Time will run On smoother, till Favonius re-inspire The frozen earth, and clothe in fresh attire The lily and rose, that neither sowed nor spun. What neat repast shall feast us, light and choice, Of Attic taste, with wine, whence we may rise To hear the lute well touched, or artful voice Warble immortal notes and Tuscan air? He who of those delights can judge, and spare To interpose them oft, is not unwise.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XX, To Mr Lawrence

Contributed by: Zaady

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