John Milton

1608 - 1674

A Quote by John Milton on nature

in

Accuse not Nature: she hath done her part; Do thou but thine.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book viii. Line 561.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on daughters, men, and sons

Adam the goodliest man of men since born His sons, the fairest of her daughters Eve.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book iv. Line 323.

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A Quote by John Milton on hell

in

All hell broke loose.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book iv. Line 918.

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A Quote by John Milton on harmony and society

Among unequals what society Can sort, what harmony, or true delight?

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book viii. Line 383.

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A Quote by John Milton on garden, leisure, pleasure, and retirement

And add to these retired Leisure, That in trim gardens takes his pleasure.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Il Penseroso. Line 49.

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A Quote by John Milton on order

in

And as an ev'ning dragon came, Assailant on the perched roosts And nests in order rang'd Of tame villatic fowl.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Samson Agonistes. Line 1692.

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A Quote by John Milton on rhetoric and wit

Enjoy your dear wit and gay rhetoric, That hath so well been taught her dazzling fence.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Comus. Line 790.

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A Quote by John Milton on mind

in

A grateful mind By owing owes not, but still pays, at once Indebted and discharg'd.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book iv. Line 55.

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A Quote by John Milton on earth and heaven

A heaven on earth.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book iv. Line 208.

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A Quote by John Milton on boldness, gold, learning, peace, power, religion, sage, sons, spirituality, and war

Vane, young in years, but in sage counsel old, Than whom a better senator ne'er held The helm of Rome, when gowns, not arms, repelled The fierce Epirot and the African bold, Whether to settle peace, or to unfold The drift of hollow states hard to be spelled, Then to advise how war may, best upheld, Move by her two main nerves, iron and gold, In all her equipage; besides to know Both spiritual power and civil, what each means, What severs each, thou hast learned, which few have done: The bounds of either sword to thee we owe: Therefore on thy firm hand Religion leans In peace, and reckons thee her eldest son.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XVII, To Sir Henry Vane the Younger

Contributed by: Zaady

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