John Milton

1608 - 1674

A Quote by John Milton on order

in

And as an ev'ning dragon came, Assailant on the perched roosts And nests in order rang'd Of tame villatic fowl.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Samson Agonistes. Line 1692.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on caring and immortality

And ever against eating cares Lap me in soft Lydian airs, Married to immortal verse,

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on heaven, hell, mind, and time

A mind not to be chang'd by place or time. The mind is its own place, and in itself Can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton

A pillar'd shade High overarch'd, and echoing walks between.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book ix. Line 1106.

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A Quote by John Milton on poets and reason

A poet soaring in the high reason of his fancies, with his garland and singing robes about him.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: The Reason of Church Government. Introduction, Book ii.

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A Quote by John Milton on memory, men, and names

A thousand fantasies Begin to throng into my memory, Of calling shapes, and beck'ning shadows dire, And airy tongues that syllable men's names On sands and shores and desert wildernesses.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Comus. Line 205.

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A Quote by John Milton on beginning, birds, charm, day, earth, gloom, inferiority, influence, kiss, needs, peace, shame, wonder, world, and elightenment

But peaceful was the night Wherein the Prince of Light His reign of peace upon the earth began. The winds with wonder whist, Smoothly the waters kiss, Whispering new joys to the mild Ocean,- Who now hath quite forgot to rave, While birds of calm sit brooding on the charmed wave. The stars, with deep amaze, Stand fixed in steadfast gaze, Bending one way their precious influence; And will not take their flight, For all the morning light, Or Lucifer that often warmed them thence; But in their glimmering orbs did glow, Until their Lord himself bespake, and bid them go. And, though the shady gloom Had given day her room, The sun himself withheld his wonted speed, And hid his head for shame, As his inferior flame The new-enlightened world no more should need: He saw a greater Sun appear Than his bright throne or burning axeltree could bear.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: The Peaceful Night

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A Quote by John Milton on cheerfulness, day, god, good, laws, learning, life, repentance, rest, and time

Cyriac, whose grandsire on the royal bench Of British Themis, with no mean applause Pronounced and in his volumes taught our laws, Which others at their bar so often wrench; Today deep thoughts resolve with me to drench In mirth, that after no repenting draws; Let Euclid rest and Archimedes pause, And what the Swede intends, and what the French. To measure life learn thou betimes, and know Toward solid good what leads the nearest way; For other things mild Heav'n a time ordains, And disapproves that care, though wise in show, That with superfluous burden loads the day, And, when God sends a cheerful hour, refrains.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XXI, To Cyriac Skinner

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A Quote by John Milton on contentment, daughters, fatherhood, gold, good, judgment, liberty, life, nobility, parliament, praise, presidency, victory, and words

Daughter to that good Earl, once President Of England's Council, and her Treasury, Who lived in both, unstained with gold or fee, And left them both, more in himself content, Till sad the breaking of that Parliament Broke him, as that dishonest victory At Chaeronea, fatal to liberty, Killed with report that old man eloquent. Though later born than to have known the days Wherein your father flourished, yet by you, Madam, methinks I see him living yet; So well your words his noble virtues praise, That all both judge you to relate them true, And to possess them, honoured Margaret.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet X, To the Lady Margaret Ley

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A Quote by John Milton on abstinence, christianity, immortality, innocence, praise, vices, virtue, and world

He that can apprehend and consider vice with all her baits and seeming pleasures, and yet abstain, and yet distinguish, and yet prefer that which is truly better, he is the true wayfaring Christian. I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race, where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat. Assuredly we bring not innocence into the world, we bring impurity much rather: that which purifies us is trial, and trial is by what is contrary.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Areopagitica

Contributed by: Zaady

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