John Milton

1608 - 1674

A Quote by John Milton on hope, peace, and rest

Where peace And rest can never dwell, hope never comes That comes to all.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book i. Line 65.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on revenge and victory

Which, if not victory, is yet revenge.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book ii. Line 105.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on despair, heaven, hell, and suffering

Which way shall I fly Infinite wrath and infinite despair? Which way I fly is hell; myself am hell; And in the lowest deep a lower deep, Still threat'ning to devour me, opens wide, To which the hell I suffer seems a heaven.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book iv. Line 73.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on soul

in

Who, as they sung, would take the prison'd soul And lap it in Elysium.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Comus. Line 256.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on silence

in

Who shall silence all the airs and madrigals that whisper softness in chambers?

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Areopagitica.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on love

in

With a smile that glow'd Celestial rosy red, love's proper hue.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book viii. Line 618.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton

With centric and eccentric scribbled o'er, Cycle and epicycle, orb in orb.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book viii. Line 83.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on audiences and sage

With grave Aspect he rose, and in his rising seem'd A pillar of state; deep on his front engraven Deliberation sat, and public care; And princely counsel in his face yet shone, Majestic though in ruin: sage he stood, With Atlantean shoulders, fit to bear The weight of mightiest monarchies; his look Drew audience and attention still as night Or summer's noontide air.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book ii. Line 300.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on confusion

With ruin upon ruin, rout on rout, Confusion worse confounded.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book ii. Line 995.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on birds, change, charm, earth, heaven, seasons, silence, and time

With thee conversing I forget all time, All seasons, and their change,--all please alike. Sweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, With charm of earliest birds; pleasant the sun When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glist'ring with dew; fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers; and sweet the coming on Of grateful ev'ning mild; then silent night With this her solemn bird and this fair moon, And these the gems of heaven, her starry train: But neither breath of morn when she ascends With charm of earliest birds, nor rising sun On this delightful land, nor herb, fruit, flower, Glist'ring with dew, nor fragrance after showers, Nor grateful ev'ning mild, nor silent night With this her solemn bird, nor walk by moon Or glittering starlight, without thee is sweet.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book iv. Line 639.

Contributed by: Zaady

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