John Lyly

1554 - 1606

A Quote by John Lyly on colors, destiny, friendship, misery, and time

Time draweth wrinkles in a fair face, but addeth fresh colors to a fast friend, which neither heat, nor cold, nor misery, nor place, nor destiny, can alter or diminish.

John Lyly (1554 - 1606)

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A Quote by John Lyly

Be valyaunt, but not too venturous. Let thy attyre bee comely, but not costly.

John Lyly (1554 - 1606)

Source: Euphues, 1579 (Arber's reprint), page 39.

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A Quote by John Lyly

Maydens, be they never so foolyshe, yet beeing fayre they are commonly fortunate.

John Lyly (1554 - 1606)

Source: Euphues and his England, page 279.

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A Quote by John Lyly on earth and heaven

Marriages are made in heaven and consummated on Earth.

John Lyly (1554 - 1606)

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A Quote by John Lyly on men

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All men [are] of one metal, but not in one mold.

John Lyly (1554 - 1606)

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A Quote by John Lyly on companions and misery

In misery it is great comfort to have a companion.

John Lyly (1554 - 1606)

Source: Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit (1579)

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A Quote by John Lyly

Night has a thousand eyes.

John Lyly (1554 - 1606)

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A Quote by John Lyly

I mean not to run with the Hare and holde with the Hounde.

John Lyly (1554 - 1606)

Source: Euphues, 1579 (Arber's reprint), Page 107.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Lyly on books, money, and study

Far more seemly to have thy study full of books, than thy purse full of money.

John Lyly (1554 - 1606)

Source: Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit (1579)

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A Quote by John Lyly on conscience

A clere conscience is a sure carde.

John Lyly (1554 - 1606)

Source: Euphues, 1579, page 207.

Contributed by: Zaady

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