John Locke

1632 - 1704

A Quote by John Locke on men, reason, and society

The reason why men enter into society is the preservation of their property.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Two Treatises of Government, 1698

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on action, men, and thought

I have always thought the actions of men are the best interpreters of their thoughts.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on errors, interest, men, passion, and temptation

All men are liable to error, and most men are, in many points, by passion or interest, under temptation to it.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on beginning, certainty, doubt, eternity, existence, god, happiness, hunger, impossibility, intelligence, knowledge, needs, originality, pain, perception, power, time, and world

To show, therefore, that we are capable of knowing, i.e. being certain that there is a God, and how we may come by this certainty, I think we need go no further than ourselves, and that undoubted knowledge we have of our own existence. . . . For man knows that he himself exists. . . . If any one pretends to be so sceptical as to deny his own existence, (for really to doubt of it is manifestly impossible,) let him for me enjoy his beloved happiness of being nothing, until hunger or some other pain convince him of the contrary. . . . He knows also that nothing cannot produce a being; therefore something must have existed from eternity. . . . Next, it is evident, that what had its being and beginning from another, must also have all that which is in and belongs to its being from another too. All the powers it has must be owing to and received from the same source. This eternal source, then, of all being must also be the source and original of all power; and so this eternal Being must be also the most powerful. . . . And most knowing. Again, a man finds in himself perception and knowledge. We have then got one step further; and we are certain now that there is not only some being, but some knowing, intelligent being in the world. There was a time, then, when there was no knowing being, and when knowledge began to be; or else there has been also a knowing being from eternity. . . . And therefore God.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Second Treatise of Government, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

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