John Locke

1632 - 1704

A Quote by John Locke on punishment

If punishment makes not the will supple it hardens the offender.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Some Thoughts Concerning Education, 1693

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on time and trust

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Every man must some time or other be trusted to himself.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on character, desires, and discipline

The discipline of desire is the background of character.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on children, curiosity, knowledge, reason, time, and trifle

Curiosity in children, is but an appetite for knowledge. One great reason why children abandon themselves wholly to silly pursuits and trifle away their time insipidly is, because they find their curiosity balked, and their inquiries neglected.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on age, authority, birth, equality, freedom, gratitude, justice, men, merit, nature, respect, understanding, and virtue

Though I have said above. . . . That all men by Nature are equal, I cannot be supposed to understand all sorts of Equality: Age or Virtue may give Men a just Precedency: Excellency of Parts and Merit may place others above the common level: Birth may subject some, and Alliance or Benefits others, to pay an Observance to those to whom Nature, Gratitude or other Respects may have made it due; and yet all this consists with the Equality which all men are in, in respect of Jurisdiction or Dominion one over another, which was the Equality I there spoke of . . . being that equal Right that every Man hath, to his natural Freedom, without being subjected to the Will or Authority of any other Man.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Second Treatise of Government, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on ideas, words, and world

We should have a great many fewer disputes in the world if only words were taken for what they are, the signs of our ideas only, and not for things themselves.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on beginning, laws, and tyranny

Wherever Law ends, Tyranny begins.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Second Treatise of Government, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on agriculture, army, dignity, fashion, idleness, men, profit, sports, thought, and understanding

The great men among the ancients understood very well how to reconcile manual labour with affairs of state, and thought it no lessening to their dignity to make the one the recreation to the other. That indeed which seems most generally to have employed and diverted their spare hours, was agriculture. Gideon among the Jews was taken from threshing, as well as Cincinnatus amongst the Romans from the plough, to command the armies of their countries . . . and, as I remember, Cyrus thought gardening so little beneath the dignity and grandeur of a throne, that he showed Xenophon a large field of fruit trees all of his own planting . . . Delving, planting, inoculating, or any the like profitable employments would be no less a diversion than any of the idle sports in fashion, if men could be brought to delight in them.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Two Treatises of Government, 1698

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on clarity

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. . . mathematical proofs, like diamonds, are hard and clear, and will be touched with nothing but strict reasoning.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: D. Burton, Elementary Number Theory, Boston: Allyn and Bacon 1980.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on reason

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New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any other reason but because they are not already common.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

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