John Locke

1632 - 1704

A Quote by John Locke on authority, clarity, faith, ideas, judgment, knowledge, principles, and reason

In all things, therefore, where we have clear evidence from our ideas, and those principles of knowledge I have above mentioned, reason is the proper judge; and revelation, though it may, in consenting with it, confirm its dictates, yet cannot in such cases invalidate its decrees: nor can we be obliged, where we have the clear and evident sentience of reason, to quit it for the contrary opinion, under a pretence that it is matter of faith: which can have no authority against the plain and clear dictates of reason.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on destruction, force, god, men, obedience, people, power, slavery, violence, and war

Whenever the legislators endeavor to take away and destroy the property of the people, or to reduce them to slavery under arbitrary power, they put themselves into a state of war with the people, who are thereupon absolved from any farther obedience, and are left to the common refuge which God hath provided for all men against force and violence.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Two Treatises of Government, 1698

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on faith, judgment, mind, reason, and truth

Revelation in matters where reason cannot judge, or but probably, ought to be hearkened to. First, Whatever proposition is revealed, of whose truth our mind, by its natural faculties and notions, cannot judge, that is purely matter of faith, and above reason.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on ideas, mind, reflection, reverie, and understanding

Reverie is when ideas float in our mind without reflection or regard of the understanding.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on rudeness

There cannot be greater rudeness than to interrupt another in the current of his discourse.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on destruction, liberty, obedience, originality, people, power, safety, security, slavery, society, and war

. . . whenever the Legislators endeavour to take away, and destroy the Property of the People, or to reduce them to Slavery under Arbitrary Power, they put themselves into a state of War with the People, who are thereupon absolved from any farther Obedience. . . . [Power then] devolves to the People, who have a Right to resume their original Liberty, and, by the Establishment of a new Legislative (such as they shall think fit) provide for their own Safety and Security, which is the end for which they are in Society.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Second Treatise of Government, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on body, happiness, mind, and world

A sound mind in a sound body, is a short but full description of a happy state in this world.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Second Treatise of Government, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on business, mind, struggle, war, and work

Set the mind to work, and apply the thoughts vigorously to the business, for it holds in the struggles of the mind, as in those of war, that to think we shall conquer is to conquer.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on beginning, laws, and tyranny

Wherever Law ends, Tyranny begins.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Second Treatise of Government, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on agriculture, army, dignity, fashion, idleness, men, profit, sports, thought, and understanding

The great men among the ancients understood very well how to reconcile manual labour with affairs of state, and thought it no lessening to their dignity to make the one the recreation to the other. That indeed which seems most generally to have employed and diverted their spare hours, was agriculture. Gideon among the Jews was taken from threshing, as well as Cincinnatus amongst the Romans from the plough, to command the armies of their countries . . . and, as I remember, Cyrus thought gardening so little beneath the dignity and grandeur of a throne, that he showed Xenophon a large field of fruit trees all of his own planting . . . Delving, planting, inoculating, or any the like profitable employments would be no less a diversion than any of the idle sports in fashion, if men could be brought to delight in them.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Two Treatises of Government, 1698

Contributed by: Zaady

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