John Locke

1632 - 1704

A Quote by John Locke on experience and knowledge

No man's knowledge here can go beyond his experience.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on certainty, doubt, existence, experience, intuition, knowledge, needs, pain, perception, pleasure, proof, reason, thinking, and thought

Our knowledge of our own existence is intuitive. As for our own existence, we perceive it so plainly and so certainly, that it neither needs nor is capable of any proof. . . . I think, I reason, I feel pleasure and pain: can any of these be more evident to me than my own existence? . . . For if I know I feel pain, it is evident I have as certain perception of my own existence, as of the existence of the pain I feel: or if I know I doubt, I have as certain perception of the existence of the thing doubting, as of that thought which I call doubt. Experience then convinces us, that we have an intuitive knowledge of our own existence, and an internal infallible perception that we are. In every act of sensation, reasoning, or thinking, we are conscious to ourselves of our own being; and, in this matter, come not short of the highest degree of certainty.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on knowledge and world

The only fence against the world is a thorough knowledge of it.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Some Thoughts Concerning Education, 1693

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on christianity, corruption, destruction, fraud, friendship, kindness, men, people, religion, salvation, and suffering

Now, I appeal to the consciences of those that persecute, torment, destroy, and kill other men upon pretence of religion, whether they do it out of friendship and kindness towards them or no? I say, if all this be done merely to make men Christians and procure their salvation, why then do they suffer whoredom, fraud, malice and such-like enormities, which (according to the Apostle) manifestly relish of heathenish corruption, to predominate so much and abound amongst their flocks and people?

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: A Letter Concerning Toleration

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on destruction, liberty, obedience, originality, people, power, safety, security, slavery, society, and war

. . . whenever the Legislators endeavour to take away, and destroy the Property of the People, or to reduce them to Slavery under Arbitrary Power, they put themselves into a state of War with the People, who are thereupon absolved from any farther Obedience. . . . [Power then] devolves to the People, who have a Right to resume their original Liberty, and, by the Establishment of a new Legislative (such as they shall think fit) provide for their own Safety and Security, which is the end for which they are in Society.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Second Treatise of Government, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on body, happiness, mind, and world

A sound mind in a sound body, is a short but full description of a happy state in this world.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Second Treatise of Government, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on business, mind, struggle, war, and work

Set the mind to work, and apply the thoughts vigorously to the business, for it holds in the struggles of the mind, as in those of war, that to think we shall conquer is to conquer.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on errors, possessions, and truth

It is one thing to show a man that he is in an error, and another to put him in possession of truth.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on justice, society, and truth

Justice and truth are the common ties of society

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Some Thoughts Concerning Education, 1693

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on communication, discovery, eternity, fatherhood, god, knowledge, mankind, reason, and truth

Reason is natural revelation, whereby the eternal father of light, and fountain of all knowledge, communicates to mankind that portion of truth which he has laid within the reach of their natural faculties: revelation is natural reason enlarged by a new set of discoveries communicated by God. . . .

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

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