John Keats

1795 - 1821

A Quote by John Keats on friendship and seasons

Seasons of mists and mellow fruitfulness, Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun; Conspiring with him how to load and bless With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run; To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees, And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core; To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells With a sweet kernel; to set budding more, And still more, later flowers for the bees, Until they think warm days will never cease, For Summer has o'er-brimm'd their clammy cells.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: To Autumn

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on beauty, dreams, health, joy, quiet, and sleep

A thing of beauty is a joy forever: Its loveliness increases; it will never Pass into nothingness; but still will keep A bower quiet for us, and a sleep Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Endymion

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on weakness

A poor, weak, palsy-stricken, churchyard thing.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: The Eve of St. Agnes. Stanza 18.

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A Quote by John Keats on cleverness, good, and men

Clever men are good, but they are not the best.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Goethe. Edinburgh Review, 1828.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on dance and songs

Dance and Provençal song and sunburnt mirth! Oh for a beaker full of the warm South, Full of the true, the blushful Hippocrene! With beaded bubbles winking at the brim, And purple-stainèd mouth.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Ode to a Nightingale.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on peace

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The days of peace and slumberous calm are fled.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Hyperion. Book ii.

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A Quote by John Keats on authors and philosophy

Axioms in philosophy are not axioms until they are proved upon our pulses: we read fine things but never feel them to the full until we have gone the same steps as the author.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Letters, To J. H. Reynolds, 3 May 1818

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on experience, life, and proverbs

Nothing ever becomes real till it is experienced-even a proverb is no proverb to you till your life has illustrated it.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Ltrs, George & Georgiana Keats, 3May1819

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats

The eye of the intellect "sees in all objects what it brought with it the means of seeing."

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Varnhagen Von Ense's Memoirs. London and Westminster Review, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on fear and immortality

He ne'er is crown'd With immortality, who fears to follow Where airy voices lead.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Endymion. Book ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

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