John Keats

1795 - 1821

A Quote by John Keats on life

in

The uttered part of a man's life, let us always repeat, bears to the unuttered, unconscious part a small unknown proportion. He himself never knows it, much less do others.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Sir Walter Scott. London and Westminster Review, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on good, judgment, and maxims

We are firm believers in the maxim that for all right judgment of any man or thing it is useful, nay, essential, to see his good qualities before pronouncing on his bad.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Goethe. Edinburgh Review, 1828.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on grace

in

Though a quarrel in the streets is a thing to be hated, the energies displayed in it are fine; the commonest man shows a grace in his quarrel.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Letter to George and Georgiana Keats (May 1819)

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A Quote by John Keats on lies and water

in

Here lies one whose name was writ in water.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on bitterness, death, desires, enemies, heart, lies, mortality, poets, power, water, and words

This Grave contains all that was Mortal of a Young English Poet Who on his Death Bed in the Bitterness of his Heart at the Malicious Power of his Enemies Desired these words to be engraved on his Tomb Stone "Here lies One Whose Name was writ in Water."

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: (Protestant Cemetery; Rome, Italy)

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A Quote by John Keats on happiness

In a drear-nighted December, Too happy, happy tree, Thy branches ne'er remember Their green felicity.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Stanzas.

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A Quote by John Keats on health and nature

Blessed is the healthy nature; it is the coherent, sweetly co-operative, not incoherent, self-distracting, self-destructive one!

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Sir Walter Scott. London and Westminster Review, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on beauty, dreams, health, joy, quiet, and sleep

A thing of beauty is a joy forever: Its loveliness increases; it will never Pass into nothingness; but still will keep A bower quiet for us, and a sleep Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Endymion

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A Quote by John Keats on weakness

A poor, weak, palsy-stricken, churchyard thing.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: The Eve of St. Agnes. Stanza 18.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on cleverness, good, and men

Clever men are good, but they are not the best.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Goethe. Edinburgh Review, 1828.

Contributed by: Zaady

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