John Keats

1795 - 1821

A Quote by John Keats on birth, electricity, heroism, nature, pity, and wonder

There is an electric fire in human nature tending to purify - so that among these human creatures there is continually some birth of new heroism. The pity is that we must wonder at it, as we should at finding a pearl in rubbish.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Letter to George and Georgiana Keats (May 1819)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on legends

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Asleep in lap of legends old.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: The Eve of St. Agnes. Stanza 15.

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A Quote by John Keats on life and time

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One life,-a little gleam of time between two Eternities.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: The Hero as a Man of Letters.

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A Quote by John Keats on literature and men

Literary men are . . . a perpetual priesthood.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: State of German Literature.

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A Quote by John Keats on literature, soul, thinking, and thought

Literature is the Thought of thinking Souls.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Sir Walter Scott. London and Westminster Review, 1838.

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A Quote by John Keats on forgiveness, love, and water

Love in a hut, with water and crust, Is-Love, forgive us!-cinders, ashes, dust; Love in a palace is perhaps at last More grievous torment than a hermit's fast.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Lamia. Part ii.

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A Quote by John Keats on life

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The uttered part of a man's life, let us always repeat, bears to the unuttered, unconscious part a small unknown proportion. He himself never knows it, much less do others.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Sir Walter Scott. London and Westminster Review, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on mercy and play

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He play'd an ancient ditty long since mute, In Provence call'd "La belle dame sans mercy."

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: The Eve of St. Agnes. Stanza 33.

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A Quote by John Keats on art

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The excellency of every art is its intensity, capable of making all disagreeable evaporate.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

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A Quote by John Keats on friendship and seasons

Seasons of mists and mellow fruitfulness, Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun; Conspiring with him how to load and bless With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run; To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees, And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core; To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells With a sweet kernel; to set budding more, And still more, later flowers for the bees, Until they think warm days will never cease, For Summer has o'er-brimm'd their clammy cells.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: To Autumn

Contributed by: Zaady

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