John Keats

1795 - 1821

A Quote by John Keats on legends

in

Asleep in lap of legends old.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: The Eve of St. Agnes. Stanza 15.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on life and time

in

One life,-a little gleam of time between two Eternities.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: The Hero as a Man of Letters.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on literature and men

Literary men are . . . a perpetual priesthood.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: State of German Literature.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on literature, soul, thinking, and thought

Literature is the Thought of thinking Souls.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Sir Walter Scott. London and Westminster Review, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on forgiveness, love, and water

Love in a hut, with water and crust, Is-Love, forgive us!-cinders, ashes, dust; Love in a palace is perhaps at last More grievous torment than a hermit's fast.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Lamia. Part ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on life

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The uttered part of a man's life, let us always repeat, bears to the unuttered, unconscious part a small unknown proportion. He himself never knows it, much less do others.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Sir Walter Scott. London and Westminster Review, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on good, judgment, and maxims

We are firm believers in the maxim that for all right judgment of any man or thing it is useful, nay, essential, to see his good qualities before pronouncing on his bad.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Goethe. Edinburgh Review, 1828.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on mercy and play

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He play'd an ancient ditty long since mute, In Provence call'd "La belle dame sans mercy."

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: The Eve of St. Agnes. Stanza 33.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on art

in

The excellency of every art is its intensity, capable of making all disagreeable evaporate.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on friendship and seasons

Seasons of mists and mellow fruitfulness, Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun; Conspiring with him how to load and bless With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run; To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees, And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core; To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells With a sweet kernel; to set budding more, And still more, later flowers for the bees, Until they think warm days will never cease, For Summer has o'er-brimm'd their clammy cells.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: To Autumn

Contributed by: Zaady

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