John Keats

1795 - 1821

A Quote by John Keats

So many, and so many, and such glee.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Endymion. Book iv.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on good, kindness, love, sorrow, and thought

To sorrow I bade good-morrow, And thought to leave her far away behind; But cheerly, cheerly, She loves me dearly; She is so constant to me, and so kind.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Endymion. Book iv.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on eternity, silence, speech, and time

As the Swiss inscription says: Sprechen ist silbern, Schweigen ist golden,- "Speech is silvern, Silence is golden;" or, as I might rather express it, Speech is of Time, Silence is of Eternity.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Sartor Resartus. Book iii. Chap. iii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats

He from forth the closet brought a heap Of candied apple, quince, and plum, and gourd; With jellies soother thank the creamy curd, And lucent syrops, tinct with cinnamon; Mama and dates, in argosy transferr'd From Fez; and spiced dainties, every one, From silken Samarcand to cedar'd Lebanon.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats

The stars look very cold about the sky, And I have many miles on foot to fare.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Keen, Fitful Gusts are Whispering Here and There

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A Quote by John Keats on mind

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The only means of strengthening one's intellect is to make up one's mind about nothing - to let the mind be a thoroughfare for all thoughts. Not a select party.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Letter to George and Georgiana Keats (September 1819)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on death, earth, and poetry

The poetry of earth is never dead.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: On the Grasshopper and Cricket.

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A Quote by John Keats on anxiety, religion, and wishes

His religion at best is an anxious wish,-like that of Rabelais, a great Perhaps.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Burns. Edinburgh Review, 1828.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on aphorisms, meaning, ridicule, and truth

We have oftener than once endeavoured to attach some meaning to that aphorism, vulgarly imputed to Shaftesbury, which however we can find nowhere in his works, that "ridicule is the test of truth."

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Voltaire. Foreign Review, 1829.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats

Hear ye not the hum Of mighty workings?

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Addressed to Haydon. Sonnet x.

Contributed by: Zaady

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